My adventures in the woods, streams, rivers, fields, and lakes of Michigan

Archive for January, 2013

Northern Cardinal, Cardinalis cardinalis

The Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a North American bird in the genus Cardinalis; it is also known colloquially as the redbird or common cardinal. It can be found in southern Canada, through the eastern United States from Maine to Texas and south through Mexico. It is found in woodlands, gardens, shrub lands, and swamps.

The Northern Cardinal is a mid-sized songbird with a body length of 21 centimeters (8.3 inches). It has a distinctive crest on the head and a mask on the face which is black in the male and gray in the female. The male is a vibrant red, while the female is a dull red-brown shade. The Northern Cardinal is mainly granivorous, but also feeds on insects and fruit. The male behaves territorially, marking out his territory with song. During courtship, the male feeds seed to the female beak-to-beak. A clutch of three to four eggs is laid, and two to four clutches are produced each year.

The females tend to be shy and retiring, staying hidden in thickets most of the time. The males are very aggressive when it comes to defending their territories, and can often be seen perched near the top of a tree while singing to let other males know who the boss is.

Cardinals will readily come to a backyard feeder, and they are often the birds people most want to attract when they do begin feeding birds.

On to the photos.

Male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

 

Juvenile male northern cardinal

Juvenile male northern cardinal

Juvenile male northern cardinal

Juvenile male northern cardinal

Juvenile male northern cardinal

Juvenile male northern cardinal

Juvenile male northern cardinal

Juvenile male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Juvenile male northern cardinal

Juvenile male northern cardinal

Juvenile female northern cardinal

Juvenile female northern cardinal

Juvenile female northern cardinal

Juvenile female northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

DSC_0191

Male northern cardinal

Juvenile female northern cardinal

Juvenile female northern cardinal

Juvenile female northern cardinal

Juvenile female northern cardinal

Juvenile female northern cardinal

Juvenile female northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Female northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

Male northern cardinal

This is number 17 in my photo life list, only 333 to go!

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!

Advertisements

Red-tailed Hawk, Buteo jamaicensis

I’m moving the red-tailed hawks up in the schedule, just for Emily of Bella Remy Photography.

The Red-tailed Hawk is one of the most widely distributed hawks in the Americas. It breeds from central Alaska, the Yukon, and the Northwest Territories east to southern Quebec and the Maritime Provinces of Canada, and south to Florida, the West Indies, and Central America. The winter range stretches from southern Canada south throughout the remainder of the breeding range.

Its preferred habitat is mixed forest and field, with high bluffs or trees that may be used as perch sites. It occupies a wide range of habitats and altitudes, including deserts, grasslands, coastal regions, mountains, foothills of mountains,  coniferous and deciduous woodlands, tropical rainforests, agricultural fields and urban areas. It is second only to the Peregrine Falcon in the use of diverse habitats in North America. It lives throughout the North American continent, except in areas of unbroken forest or the high Arctic.

The Red-tailed Hawk is widespread in North America, partially due to historic settlement patterns, which have benefited it. The clearing of forests in the Northeast created hunting areas, while the preservation of woodlots left the species with viable nest sites. The planting of trees in the west allowed the Red-tailed Hawk to expand its range by creating nest sites where there had been none. The construction of highways with utility poles alongside treeless medians provided perfect habitat for perch-hunting. Unlike some other raptors, the Red-tailed Hawk are seemingly unfazed by considerable human activity and can nest and live in close proximity to large numbers of humans. Thus, the species can also be found in cities, where common prey such as rock pigeons and brown rats may support their populations.

On to the photos.

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Juvenile Red-tailed hawk

Juvenile Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk in flight

Red-tailed hawk in flight

Red-tailed hawk in flight

Red-tailed hawk in flight

Red-tailed hawk in flight

Red-tailed hawk in flight

 

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk in flight

Red-tailed hawk in flight

Red-tailed hawk in flight

Red-tailed hawk in flight

DSC_9273

Red-tailed hawk in flight

DSC_9274

Red-tailed hawk in flight

Most of those shots are of my two “pet” red-tailed hawks. No, I didn’t capture and keep them, except in photos. Both of them were hatched in a nest near to where I lived, one year apart from one another. They grew up with me chasing them around to photograph them, and became quite used to my presence over time.

This is number 16 in my photo life list, only 334 to go!

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!


Brown Creeper, Certhia americana

The Brown Creeper (Certhia americana), also known as the American Tree Creeper, is a small songbird, the only North American member of the treecreeper family Certhiidae.

Adults are brown on the upper parts with light spotting, resembling a piece of tree bark, with white underparts. They have a long thin bill with a slight downward curve and a long stiff tail used for support as the bird creeps upwards much as do woodpeckers.

They forage on tree trunks and branches, typically spiraling upwards from the bottom of a tree trunk, and then flying down to the bottom of another tree. They hop in quick, short motions, with their body flattened against the bark, probing with their beak for insects. They will rarely feed on the ground. They mainly eat small insects and spiders found in the bark, but sometimes they will eat seeds in winter.

These little buggers have given me fits over the years, trying to capture a good photo of them. They never sit still, they are small, and they are so well camouflaged that in most of the photos of them that I have taken, it is difficult to pick the creepers out from the bark of the tree that they were on. They also seem to prefer the shady side of the tree when I point a camera at them.

Then, just as I was beginning this series, one of them slipped up, and let me get these shots of it.

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

You can see how they use their long (for a small bird) forked tail for support, and their curved bills to probe for food.

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

This is number 15 in my photo life list, only 335 to go!

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!


Pileated Woodpecker, Dryocopus pileatus

The Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) is a very large North American woodpecker, roughly crow-sized, inhabiting deciduous forests in eastern North America, the Great Lakes, the boreal forests of Canada, and parts of the Pacific coast. It is also the largest woodpecker in the United States, excepting the possibly extinct Ivory-billed Woodpecker.

These birds mainly eat insects, especially carpenter ants and wood-boring beetle larvae. They also eat fruits, nuts, and berries, including poison ivy berries. Pileated Woodpeckers will often chip out large and roughly rectangular holes in trees while searching out insects, especially ant galleries. They also will lap up ants by reaching with their long tongue into crevices. They are self-assured on the vertical surfaces of large trees but can seem awkward while feeding on small branches and vines. Pileated woodpeckers may also forage on or near the ground, especially around fallen, dead trees, which can contain a smorgasbord of insect life. They may forage around the sides of human homes or even cars and can occasionally be attracted to suet-type feeders. Although they are less likely feeder visitors than smaller woodpeckers, Pileateds may regularly be attracted to them in areas experiencing harsh winter conditions.

Usually, Pileated woodpeckers excavate their large nests in the cavities of dead trees. Woodpeckers make such large holes in dead trees that the holes can cause a small tree to break in half. The roost of a Pileated Woodpecker usually has multiple entrance holes. Pileated Woodpeckers raise their young every year in a hole in a tree. In April, the hole made by the male attracts a female for mating and raising their young. Once the brood is raised, the Pileated Woodpeckers abandon the hole and will not use it the next year. When abandoned, these holes—made similarly by all woodpeckers—provide good homes in future years for many forest song birds and a wide variety of other animals. Locally, owls and tree-nesting ducks may largely rely on holes made by Pileateds in which to lay their nests. Even mammals such as raccoons may use them. Other woodpeckers and smaller birds such as wrens may be attracted to Pileated holes to feed on the insects found in them. Ecologically, the entire woodpecker family is important to the well-being of many other bird species. The Pileated Woodpecker will also nest in nest boxes about 15 ft (4.6 m) off the ground.

A Pileated Woodpecker pair stays together on its territory all year round and is a non-migratory species. It will defend the territory in all seasons, but will tolerate floaters during the winter. When clashing with other pileateds, they engage in much chasing, calling, striking with the wings, and jabbing with the bill.

Like most woodpeckers, male pileateds engage in drumming.  While it may look like the same action as when they are looking for insects, drumming is most commonly to proclaim a territory. Hollow trees with a very hard outer shell of wood are often used to make the loudest sound possible, most often in the spring. I don’t know about pileateds, but other woodpecker species will use the same tree or limb for drumming on a recurring basis.

On to the photos.

Pileated woodpecker

Male Pileated woodpecker

Pileated woodpecker

Male Pileated woodpecker

Pileated woodpecker

Male Pileated woodpecker

Pileated woodpecker

Male Pileated woodpecker

Pileated woodpecker

Male Pileated woodpecker

A horrible shot of two pileated woodpeckers

A horrible shot of two pileated woodpeckers

Pileated woodpecker

Male Pileated woodpecker

Pileated woodpecker

Male Pileated woodpecker

I didn’t know that there was a difference in the coloration between the males and females until I started this post. The male has a red stripe on its lower jaw that is black on the females. So, I am going to have to get a few better photos of females to add to this. Oh, one other thing, it is said that Walter Lang based his cartoon character, Woody Woodpecker, on pileated woodpeckers.

This is number 14 in my photo life list, only 336 to go!

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!


After the snow

The tittle of this one is a little misleading, it should be “After the cold arrived”. We went through a several week-long stretch of it snowing nearly every day, but it would warm up enough to melt the snow at about the same rate as it fell. That all changed last weekend.

Last Saturday afternoon, temperatures were very warm for a West Michigan winter, approaching 55 degrees Farenheit (13 C). That night, a front passed through, along with some extremely high winds. There were gusts along the lake shore in excess of 70 MPH, and around here, the wind was strong enough to do quite a bit of damage. The wind peeled the shingles off from some roofs, siding was torn off from a few houses, and many power lines were knocked down by falling trees. With the wind came the cold.

As I was out for my walk on Sunday afternoon, my camera froze up as I was trying to shoot photos of something that will appear in another post. It was that cold, around 10 degrees Farenheit (-12 C), with the wind blowing out of the west at around 30 MPH.

It was much the same on Monday and Tuesday, although the wind was dying down slowly over time. On Tuesday, we set a record for the lowest high temperature for that date of 9 degrees F. At night, it was getting down to around -10 F (-23 C).

The reason for my rambling on about the weather is this, when will meteorologists stop relying on computer models which are flawed, and learn from experience?

The forecasts for the first part of this last week were for large amounts of lake effect snow to fall, several inches per day, the National Weather Service had issued warnings and advisories because of their predictions for large amounts of snow.

We got very little, just a couple of inches as the front passed through Saturday night, but very little lake effect snow after that, for a few days.

I know that I have written about this before, when the winds are as high as they were for the time that the warnings were in effect, we get little or no lake effect snow! The air crossing the lakes doesn’t have the time to pick up very much moisture when driven by winds that high! The high winds also “kill” any lift in the lower atmosphere, and you need lift to produce snowfall.

Late on Tuesday afternoon/early evening, the winds finally began to slack off. The National Weather Service cancelled all the warnings and advisories, and we got dumped on! Along the lake shore, there were times when it was snowing at a rate of 3 inches per hour, I know, I was trying to drive through those snow squalls for work. There were times when driving at 15 MPH was too fast, no one could see. People were driving off the road and into the ditches because they didn’t see the turns in the roads.

So it went on Wednesday as well, all told, we picked up over a foot of snow where I live, and well over two feet nearer to the lake from Tuesday evening to Thursday morning. That was after all the warnings and advisories had been cancelled.

This was not an isolated instance of the meteorologists getting it wrong. This happens at least once every winter, usually three or four times. We do not get lake effect snow when the winds are much over 25 MPH.

The meteorologists are college educated, and it’s their job to learn weather patterns. Yet, they rely solely on the computer models, and look like fools when they miss the forecasts like they do. You’d think that they would get tired of looking like fools, you’d think that they would learn from experience, but I guess not. If a weather geek like myself can figure this out, why can’t the meteorologists?

Don’t get me wrong, I think that the NWS does a fine job most of the time, but they sure seem to miss the mark when it comes to lake effect snow.

Anyway, here’s a few photos from this last week. I am going to start with a photo of the very rare, very deadly, albino tree snake. They hang in trees, waiting for an unsuspecting victim to walk under them, then the drop out off the trees to make their “kill”. Unlike vampires which go for the jugular in the front of the neck, the albino tree snakes almost always go for the back of a victim’s neck. If you don’t violently shake them off as you feel their cold fangs on your neck, they will slither down inside your clothing and wrap your spine in their icy grip!

Albino tree snake waiting to pounce

Albino tree snake waiting to pounce

Here’s a couple of a broken tree limb, I liked the patterns in the wood.

Patterns in wood

Patterns in wood

Patterns in wood

Patterns in wood

Of course I had to shoot a few of the snow on trees.

Snow on pines

Snow on pines

Snow on pines

Snow on pines

Snow on pines

Snow on pines

And, snow in general.

Snowy path

Snowy path

Snow

Snow

Snow

Snow

Snow scene at the creek

Snow scene at the creek

I’m not sure if this one “works” or not.

Strange

Strange

I couldn’t resist this one, even though it is very cliched.

Split rail fence covered in snow

Split rail fence covered in snow

There were a few birds braving the cold and snow (like they have a choice) within range of my camera.

Dark eyed junco

Dark eyed junco

Northern cardinal

Northern cardinal

Turkeys

Turkeys

Tom turkey getting worked up for spring already

Tom turkey getting worked up for spring already

I found out that 1/800 of a second at 10 degrees wasn’t enough to freeze the motion of a downy woodpecker!

Downy woodpecker

Downy woodpecker

But, it would freeze a fox squirrel enjoying the sunshine.

Fox squirrel

Fox squirrel

It would also freeze the Michelin Man in place, although I have no idea why he was hanging out in the woods like he was.

Natural snowman

Natural snowman

We had some beautiful days, despite the cold!

Sunny day

Sunny day

clouds

clouds

It seems that many people have posted photos of queen anne lace covered in snow, and being the contrarian that I am, I shot a few of it not covered in snow.

Queen anne lace

Queen anne lace

Queen anne lace

Queen anne lace

Queen anne lace

Queen anne lace

And finally, one that I hope I never see again, the aero-med helicopter on a run to pick up one of the many people injured in car crashes this last week.

Helicoptor

helicopter

I did get a few more shots of birds, but they are actually fairly good, so I am going to use them for photographic life list project, which I will get back to after this post. On that subject, I am going to cheat again, and recycle the photos of the pileated woodpecker that I posted a few weeks ago, so if you want to skip that one, you have my permission. 😉

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!


Before the snow

I’m going to take a short break in posting to my photographic life list, and post a few photos I took earlier this winter, before the snow began to stick around. The photos are mostly odds and ends, no great stories behind them, and they were taken in various places, not that it really matters. I’m going to start with a couple of a tree limb with what I thought was an interesting pattern.

Tattooed tree limb

Tattooed tree limb

Tattooed tree limb

Tattooed tree limb

Kind of a strange one, frost “exploding” as it melted off from a roof.

roof

roof

Then, a simple muskrat, only because I haven’t posted one for a while.

Muskrat

Muskrat

More patterns in wood that I found interesting.

Insect tracks in a dead tree

Insect tracks in a dead tree

The tree was an ash tree, killed by this, although it probably had help from a few others of its kind.

Emerald ash borer

Emerald ash borer

That’s an emerald ash borer, and they are an invasive species that are wiping out most of the ash trees in Michigan. I am happy to say that the one in the picture met a quick demise right after that photo was taken. A few weeks later, the county parks department removed all the dead and dying ash trees in the park where that was taken.

Then, a red squirrel during one of the few moments it wasn’t in motion.

Red squirrel

Red squirrel

Red squirrels are always on the go, while their larger cousins seem to like posing for the camera.

Fox squirrel

Fox squirrel

Hmmm. More patterns in wood, but in this small version, I can’t see the frost coating the log.

DSC_6192

Frost on a log

Next up, the proverbial odd duck, a female mallard. I couldn’t tell if she was a hybrid, or partially albino.

Odd duck

Odd duck

Odd duck

Odd duck

Another fox squirrel posing for a portrait.

Fox squirrel

Fox squirrel

Here’s a Canada goose exiting the water and drying its wings.

Canada goose

Canada goose

A few shots of whitetail deer.

Whitetail doe

Whitetail doe

Whitetail doe

Whitetail doe

Whitetail doe and fawn

Whitetail doe and fawn

Whitetail doe and fawn

Whitetail doe and fawn

Whitetail doe and fawn

Whitetail doe and fawn

Whitetail button buck

Whitetail button buck

Whitetail doe feeding

Whitetail doe feeding

The Lake Michigan beach on a sunny winter day.

Lake Michigan beach

Lake Michigan beach

Underwater leaf

Underwater leaf

Fish bone

Fish bone

Windblown sand on the Lake Michigan beach

Windblown sand on the Lake Michigan beach

Small temporary stream flowing into Lake Michigan

Small temporary stream flowing into Lake Michigan

Lake Michigan beach

Lake Michigan beach

Lake Michigan beach

Lake Michigan beach

And, a few more odds and ends to wrap this up.

The last dandelion?

The last dandelion?

Red-tailed hawk in flight

Red-tailed hawk in flight

Most are of ice covering mud puddles.

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

Patterns in ice

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!


Dark-eyed Junco, Junco hyemalis

These little members of the sparrow family are some of the most common birds throughout North America. When I was younger, many people referred to them as snowbirds, but I have no idea where that came from. In west Michigan, there are a few around all summer long, but large flocks of juncos arrive here in late fall to spend the winter here. Maybe that’s how they became known as snowbirds.

Adults generally have gray heads, necks, and breasts, gray or brown backs and wings, and a white belly, but show a confusing amount of variation in plumage details. Their white outer tail feathers flash distinctively in flight and while hopping on the ground. The bill is usually pale pinkish.

They are most often seen on the ground, searching for seeds which make up the majority of their diet.

Dark eyed junco eating dandelion seeds

Dark eyed junco eating dandelion seeds

During the winter, they often join in mixed species flocks along with chickadees, nuthatches, titmice, and others as the flocks search for food near the edges of woods. The juncos are typically found on the ground or near it, with the other species flitting about in the trees above the juncos.

Because they spend so much time on the ground, and are rather shy birds, getting good clear shots of them has proven difficult for me, but I do have a couple of recent shots.

Dark eyed junco

Dark eyed junco

Dark eyed junco

Dark eyed junco

Dark-eyed junco

Dark-eyed junco

Dark-eyed junco

Dark-eyed junco

Dark-eyed junco

Dark-eyed junco

Dark-eyed junco

Dark-eyed junco

 

I could go back and search my archives for a few more, but none are as good as that last one. I think that one of the good things about doing a photo lifers list is that as I get better photos of species of birds, I’ll be able to come back to these pages to add the newer photos quite easily.

This is number 13 in my photo life list, only 337 to go!

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!


Hermit Thrush, Catharus guttatus

The Hermit Thrush is another species of bird known more for its song than a flamboyant appearance. The Hermit Thrush’s song is ethereal and flute-like, consisting of a beginning note, then several descending musical phrases in a minor key, repeated at different pitches. They often sing from a high open location.

The song of the Hermit Thrush is audible in the “Garden” stage of Super Mario Galaxy for the Nintendo Wii.

A slightly altered song of the Hermit Thrush was used for the Mockingjay’s song in the early scenes of the Hunger Games film. The Hermit Thrush’s song, as well as the House Wren and Mourning Warbler are all very common in modern-day media.

Their breeding habitat is coniferous or mixed woods across Canada, Alaska, and the northeastern and western United States. They make a cup nest on the ground or relatively low in a tree.

Hermit Thrushes migrate to wintering grounds in the southern United States and south to Central America but some remain in northern coastal US states and southern Ontario. Although they usually only breed in forests, Hermit Thrushes will sometimes winter in parks and wooded suburban neighborhoods.

They forage on the forest floor, also in trees or shrubs, mainly eating insects and berries.

On to the photos.

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

This is number twelve in my photo life list, only 338 to go!

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!


Eastern Phoebe

The Eastern Phoebe is a plump songbird with a medium-length tail. It appears large-headed for a bird of its size. The head often appears flat on top, but phoebes sometimes raise the feathers up into a peak. Like most small flycatchers, they have short, thin bills used for catching insects.

I do hope that I have identified these correctly, if not, please let me know!

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

Juvenile Eastern Phoebe in flight

Juvenile Eastern Phoebe in flight

Juvenile Eastern Phoebe with its catch

Juvenile Eastern Phoebe with its catch

Eleven down, 339 to go!

That’s it for this one for now, thanks for stopping by!


Osprey, Pandion haliaetus

Osprey (Pandion haliaetus), sometimes known as the sea hawk, fish eagle or fish hawk, is a diurnal, fish-eating bird of prey. It is a large raptor, reaching more than 60 cm (24 in) in length and 180 cm (71 in) across the wings. It is brown on the upper parts and predominantly greyish on the head and underparts, with a black eye patch and wings.

The Osprey tolerates a wide variety of habitats, nesting in any location near a body of water providing an adequate food supply. It is found on all continents except Antarctica although in South America it occurs only as a non-breeding migrant.

As its other common name suggests, the Osprey’s diet consists almost exclusively of fish. It possesses specialised physical characteristics and exhibits unique behaviour to assist in hunting and catching prey. As a result of these unique characteristics, it has been given its own taxonomic genus, Pandion and family, Pandionidae.

Fish make up 99% of the Osprey’s diet. They are particularly well adapted to this diet, with reversible outer toes, sharp spicules on the underside of the toes, nostrils that can close to keep out water during dives, and backwards-facing scales on the talons which act as barbs to help hold its catch.

People often mistake an osprey for an eagle when seen in flight, but an eagle has much broader wings that are held flat and straight, while an osprey’s wings are much narrower, and gull like.

I don’t have many photos of ospreys, so I am going to use a couple of an osprey in flight from this last summer for now. As the osprey population in Michigan continues to rebound, I hope to add some better ones soon!

Osprey in flight

Osprey in flight

Osprey in flight

Osprey in flight

Osprey in flight

Osprey in flight

Osprey in flight

Osprey in flight

Osprey in flight

Osprey in flight

Osprey in flight

Osprey in flight

Osprey in flight

Osprey in flight

This is number ten in my photo life list, only 340 to go!

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!