My adventures in the woods, streams, rivers, fields, and lakes of Michigan

American Robin

I am going to do my first post in the series My Photographic Life List on one of those ubiquitous birds that are so common that we tend to take their beauty for granted. Like mallards and gulls, they also make great practice subjects to hone your photography skills on, because they are so common, yet another reason to love them. In many northern areas, they are considered to be the harbingers of spring, being among the first of the migrating songbirds to return to their summer breeding grounds. And, once they arrive, they soon fill the air with their lovely song, especially at dawn and dusk.

Here’s a blurb about robins from Wikipedia,

“The American Robin or North American Robin (Turdus migratorius) is a migratory songbird of the thrush family. It is named after the European Robin because of its reddish-orange breast, though the two species are not closely related, with the European robin belonging to the flycatcher family. The American Robin is widely distributed throughout North America, wintering south of Canada from Florida to central Mexico and along the Pacific Coast. It is the state bird of Connecticut, Michigan, and Wisconsin. According to some sources, the American Robin ranks behind only the Red-winged Blackbird (and just ahead of the introduced European Starling) as the most abundant, extant land bird in North America. It has seven subspecies, but only T. m. confinis in the southwest is particularly distinctive, with pale gray-brown underparts.

The American Robin is active mostly during the day and assembles in large flocks at night. Its diet consists of invertebrates (such as beetle grubs, earthworms, and caterpillars), fruits and berries. It is one of the earliest bird species to lay eggs, beginning to breed shortly after returning to its summer range from its winter range. Its nest consists of long coarse grass, twigs, paper, and feathers, and is smeared with mud and often cushioned with grass or other soft materials. It is among the first birds to sing at dawn, and its song consists of several discrete units that are repeated.”

On to the photos!

American robin

American robin

American robins

American robins

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

Juvenile American robin

Juvenile American robin

Juvenile American robin

Juvenile American robin

Juvenile American robin

Juvenile American robin

Juvenile American robin

Juvenile American robin

Juvenile American robin

Juvenile American robin

And, to wrap this up, the “Moldy robin”. 🙂 I have never seen an albino robin, although I have heard that they are rather common. I assume that this robin was an offspring of an albino, but I could be wrong.

American robin

American robin

American robin

American robin

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!

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11 responses

  1. Lots of Red Robins ! Fantastic shots and I particularly like the ones with the red berries in the second of the series. I started a Flickr catalog of the birds I’ve captured so that I can keep track. I started doing it on the ebird app on my iphone, but found the photos don’t transfer from the icloud to my ipad, so wanted a more central place.
    Also, I’ve seen that photos can be added to your list on ebird.org do you log your sightings there? I’m just learning how to do that.
    Sorry for the delay in commenting and responding. I caught a new cold and started training a wild mare, so when I get home I’m pooped!

    January 18, 2013 at 4:15 pm

    • Thanks, and no problem with the delay! I’m already doing this blog, so this is where I am going to upload my photos. I may have to look into other online sites though, in the past, my slow Verizon Internet service took forever to upload photos.

      January 19, 2013 at 1:28 am

  2. plantsamazeme

    Well Jerry you are off to a great start!
    One down, and how many birds do you have on your life list?
    You probably have photos of most of them.
    🙂

    January 18, 2013 at 8:20 pm

    • Thank you! I started with the Audubon list of over 400 species. After taking out the extinct birds, like passenger pigeons, and very rare visitors, like frigate birds, I was left with 350 species exactly. That’s still far more than I expected. Many of those are only seen here during migration, but I’m still going to try for them. Of the 350, I have photos of just under 100, so I’m going to be busy for a looong time. 😉

      January 19, 2013 at 1:39 am

  3. Nice shots. I’ve always liked robins.

    I think the red berries are some sort of hawthorn.

    January 18, 2013 at 8:43 pm

    • Thanks. The young robin was eating wild cherries, the other orange berries were mountain ash, but I’m not sure what the green berries were.

      January 19, 2013 at 1:52 am

  4. A moldy robin-that’s funny! The juveniles aren’t much to look at, are they?

    January 19, 2013 at 8:56 am

    • Thanks, it looked moldy to me when I first saw it.

      January 19, 2013 at 9:00 am

  5. Great pictures – robins are some of my favorite birds!

    January 20, 2013 at 11:50 am

    • Thank you! Mine also.

      January 20, 2013 at 1:24 pm

  6. “Moldy guy” is crazy! I love the photos in the red-berried tree – great!

    February 18, 2013 at 3:54 pm