My adventures in the woods, streams, rivers, fields, and lakes of Michigan

Rock Dove, Columba livia (I)

Note: this post, while published, is a work in progress, as are all posts in this series, My Photo Life List. My goal is to photograph every species of bird that is seen on a regular basis here in Michigan, working from a list compiled by the Michigan chapter of the Audubon Society. This will be a lifelong project, that I began in January of 2013, and as I shoot better photos of this, or any other species, I will update the post for that species with better photos when I can. While this series is not intended to be a field guide per se, my minimum standard for the photos in this series is that one has to be able to make a positive identification of the species in my photos. The information posted here is from either my observations or the Wikipedia, the online free encyclopedia, however, I have personally shot all the photos appearing in this series.

Rock Dove, Columba livia (I)

Since this is an invasive species, I’m not going to say a lot about them. I’m sure you’re all familiar with them by their common name, pigeon.

The Rock Dove or Rock Pigeon, is a member of the bird family Columbidae (doves and pigeons). In common usage, this bird is often simply referred to as the “pigeon”.

The species includes the domestic pigeon (including the fancy pigeon), and escaped domestic pigeons have given rise to feral populations around the world.

Wild Rock Doves are pale grey with two black bars on each wing, although domestic and feral pigeons are very variable in color and pattern. There are few visible differences between males and females. The species is generally monogamous, with two squeakers (young) per brood. Both parents care for the young for a time.

Habitats include various open and semi-open environments. Cliffs and rock ledges are used for roosting and breeding in the wild. Originally found wild in Europe, North Africa, and western Asia, feral Pigeon have become established in cities around the world. The species is abundant, with an estimated population of 17 to 28 million feral and wild birds in Europe.

On to my photos:

Rock dove or pigeon

Rock dove or pigeon eyeing a bug

Rock dove or pigeon

Rock dove or pigeon

Rock dove or pigeon

Rock dove or pigeon

Rock dove or pigeon

Rock dove or pigeon

Rock dove or pigeon

Rock dove or pigeon

Rock dove or pigeon

Rock dove or pigeon

Rock dove or pigeon

Rock dove or pigeon

Rock dove (pigeon) in flight

Rock dove (pigeon) in flight

 

 

 

This is number 82 in my photo life list, only 268 to go!

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!

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6 responses

  1. They’re not exactly a well-loved species. We used to get hordes of band-tailed pigeons at our feeder until we changed feeders. They could certainly empty the previous ones in a big hurry.

    April 12, 2013 at 4:22 am

    • You’re right, but I got in trouble for bashing starlings, so I thought it best not to say too much about pigeons.

      April 12, 2013 at 8:50 am

      • Just keep in mind Lincoln’s words: “you can’t please all the people all the time”… 😀

        April 12, 2013 at 12:48 pm

  2. My grandmother loved these birds and used to feed them.

    April 12, 2013 at 6:10 am

    • My views on them has moderated over the years. In my late 20’s, I ended up in the hospital with a lung infection, from something in pigeon droppings. The company I worked for bought an old furniture factory building downtown, and as part of my job, I had to remove the old dust collection system, which had become the home for generations of pigeons.

      April 12, 2013 at 8:54 am

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