My adventures in the woods, streams, rivers, fields, and lakes of Michigan

No trillium, just another new bird

On Sunday I went to Aman Park, I have done a couple of posts about it already, and I think that I have it listed on my Hiking Places page. To me, the biggest attraction of Aman Park is the huge numbers of wildflowers that bloom there in the spring, including acres of trillium.

This will be a short post, as although there were many of the wildflowers starting to bloom, not included among them were the trillium. This is mostly an update for Allen (New Hampshire Garden Solutions) and others who have asked about the trillium. The weather wasn’t the greatest either, and I could do an entire post on how poor the forecasts have been of late, but I won’t.

Since the trillium weren’t blooming, and most of my shots were taken under a very heavy overcast sky, I’ll just have to go back later and do this park justice, I’ll even get to play with my new 15-85 mm lens to get the seas of trillium blooming in the frame!

I knew that I was probably early, but with the flooding, I was worried that this year’s blooms would be destroyed, but it’s looking good!

So, on to the photos, starting with a red-bellied woodpecker playing peek-a-boo with passing walkers.

Red-bellied woodpecker

Red-bellied woodpecker

Red-bellied woodpecker

Red-bellied woodpecker

Red-bellied woodpecker

Red-bellied woodpecker

The bird was nice enough to continue its game long enough for me to adjust the exposure to make up for the horrible lighting, +2/3 stop worked best.

Later, a bluebird waved to me after it spotted me sneaking up behind it.

Eastern Bluebird

Eastern Bluebird

Eastern Bluebird

Eastern Bluebird

Eastern Bluebird waving hello

Eastern Bluebird waving hello

Eastern Bluebird waving hello

Eastern Bluebird waving hello

Now then, a sampling of the flowers, since I will be going back soon. No need to bore you all with what would be a double post.

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Trillium bud

Trillium bud

Trout lily next to dozens of trillium waiting to bloom

Trout lily next to dozens of trillium waiting to bloom

Bloodwort

Bloodwort

Dutchman's breeches

Dutchman’s breeches

Dutchman's breeches

Dutchman’s breeches

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Bloodwort

Bloodwort

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Trout lilies

Trout lilies

I must be getting old, I know I knew all of these before, but for the life of me, I can’t recall them when I need to. I see that I also missed all the spring beauties that were blooming as well, I won’t forget them in the next one!

At one point I sat down to take a break, and to watch and listen to the birds. This guy came along, another to add to my life list, a black and white warbler.

Black and white warbler

Black and white warbler

Black and white warbler

Black and white warbler

There were dozens of other warblers up in the treetops, but getting good photos of them was out of the question, so I just sat there and enjoyed the music they were making.

The only other thing of note was this rather strange looking fungi growing on a log that had fallen over.

Fungi

Fungi

I think that it’s the bottom of the fungi you can see now that the log fell over, I was going to get a different angle on it, but got distracted by all the flowers and birds.

Anyway, like I said, a short one this time, I have a bunch of photos of birds saved up for the My Photo Life List project to put into drafts, and the next post I do on Aman Park should be spectacular!

Thanks for stopping by!

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23 responses

  1. Your Trilliums are quite a bit behind ours for blooming. (As I suppose most of your flowers are, given the climate difference.)

    April 29, 2013 at 5:26 am

    • Yes, they probably are. Right now, the Great Lakes are acting as a giant refrigerator keeping us cool.

      April 29, 2013 at 7:36 am

  2. Thanks for trying, Jerry. It looks like the white trillium might be blooming next weekend if you get a couple of warm days.
    I enjoyed seeing the bluebird. I’ve only seen one of those in my lifetime because we haven’t had many of them here, even though they are called “eastern” blue birds.
    Your first unknown wildflower is hepatica, which can be white, purple, or blue. You also have some white ones lower down. I think another unknown that looks a little like phlox might be harbinger of spring but I’m not sure because I’ve never seen one in person.

    April 29, 2013 at 6:23 am

    • I may have to go back there for at least the next two weeks, for as the trillium wind down, the Virginia bluebells reach their peak.

      I think that I have a mental block when it comes to identifying plants. I read your blog, Plants Amaze Me, and others, and try to commit the IDs to memory, then I get out in the woods and revert back to “ooo, a pretty flower, I better take a photo of it.”

      April 29, 2013 at 8:31 am

      • Now you know how I am with birds!

        April 29, 2013 at 6:52 pm

      • Being colorblind doesn’t help either.

        April 30, 2013 at 2:22 am

  3. beautiful flowers, and birds, I love the bluebirds around here their blues are just so blue and almost irridesence when the sun hits them.

    April 29, 2013 at 8:22 am

    • Thanks, hopefully there will be some sun around here and I’ll catch a bluebird then. 😉

      April 29, 2013 at 8:28 am

  4. The little bird with the red head fits in the tree perfectly!

    April 29, 2013 at 11:22 am

    • Thanks for noticing that, Mary!

      April 29, 2013 at 11:46 am

  5. Those pics of the red-bellied were adorable!! I just love red-bellied woodpeckers. I get them at my feeders every day and have taken lots of photos of them. I just love these of yours, with his head popping out of the tree!

    April 29, 2013 at 3:21 pm

    • Thanks, it reminded me of a cuckoo clock.

      April 30, 2013 at 2:20 am

  6. There seemed to be quite a lot of flowers smiling while the trilliums are sulking.

    April 29, 2013 at 6:30 pm

    • Thanks, on my next visit, I hope to do them all justice.

      April 30, 2013 at 2:21 am

  7. Those woodpecker pictures are wonderful, love his little head poking out from the tree 🙂 Beautiful signs of spring, I should really get out and take some photos of English springtime coming into bloom!

    April 30, 2013 at 4:23 am

    • Thank you! And, yes you should get out and take some photos. 😉

      April 30, 2013 at 9:18 am

  8. Even more cool birds! Thx for sharing these. PS, I saw my first trillium on a nature program last weekend. They have a sort of faerie beauty, secretly blooming under the trees– really magical, I thought.

    May 1, 2013 at 1:05 pm

    • Thanks Lori, I hope to really catch the trillium in full bloom in this park in the next week, they look like white waves on a sea of green because there are so many of them.

      May 1, 2013 at 1:53 pm

      • It seems funny to catch a flower but you are absolutely right! Please do!

        May 2, 2013 at 5:55 am

  9. Val

    Hi, I’m over via Kathy’s blog, Lake Superior Spirit. So glad I found yours – I’m in the UK so don’t see a lot of your wildlife here. I love that Red Bellied Woodpecker – is it a very small bird? And the Eastern Bluebird waving hello!!

    May 2, 2013 at 5:36 am

    • Thank you for following my blog Val. The Red-bellied woodpecker is a medium size woodpecker, about the same as some of your common woodpeckers from what I can tell from the bloggers that I follow from your side of the pond.

      May 2, 2013 at 9:09 am

  10. What wonderful woodland flowers you have been able to enjoy. Thanks for sharing this great photos.

    May 3, 2013 at 7:15 pm

    • Thanks, but wait until you see the next one!

      May 4, 2013 at 2:27 am