My adventures in the woods, streams, rivers, fields, and lakes of Michigan

Aman Park, on the shores of the trillium seas 2013 part II

I went back through my archives and found the post that I did on the trillium in Aman Park last year, the date was April 15, 2012. What a difference a year makes! Last year I just caught the tail end of the trillium bloom, this year, nearly a month later, I hit the beginning of the bloom. And, I went crazy as far as the number of photos I shot, and was rewarded with too many very good photos for one post, I’ll have to do two for flowers, and maybe a third for birds. This is the second of possibly three parts, flowers and a few other things thrown in. So, let’s get to the photos.

IMG_2355

Flowering tree

IMG_2366

More trilliums

Bug

Bug

Dutchman's breeches

Dutchman’s breeches

Dutchman's breeches

Dutchman’s breeches

Spring Beauties

Spring Beauties

Spring Beauties

Spring Beauties

Trillium

Trillium

Violet

Violet

Flowering tree

Flowering tree

Wild phlox

Wild phlox

Fungi

Fungi

Fungi

Fungi

Marsh marigold and spring beauty

Marsh marigold and spring beauty

More tilliums

More tilliums

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Mixed wildflowers

Mixed wildflowers

Green double trillium

Green double trillium

Green double trillium

Green double trillium

Green double trillium

Green double trillium

Green double trillium

Green double trillium

Green double trillium

Green double trillium

Green double trillium

Green double trillium

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Redbud

Redbud

Dogwood

Dogwood

Flowering bush

Flowering bush

Virginia bluebells

Virginia bluebells

I have decided not to do a third post from today on the birds, as other than this blue-grey gnatcatcher, they’re all regulars here, mostly yellow-rumped warblers.

Blue-grey gnatcatcher

Blue-grey gnatcatcher

That’s it for this one, as I didn’t think that it required many words, thanks for stopping by!

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16 responses

  1. I’ve never seen anything like it-the trilliums seem to go on forever. It takes 6-8 years for one plant to flower from seed, so I wonder how many thousands of years we’re seeing here. If I ever spend time, effort and money going anywhere to see plants it’ll be this park.
    The plant with the yellow flowers is a large flowered bellwort (Uvularia grandiflora) which is something I’ve never seen in person.
    The shrub with the pale yellow paired flowers is fly honeysuckle (Lonicera canadensis) which isn’t often seen.
    The double (or triple) flowered trillium is quite a find. This is called a “sport” or natural mutation and plant breeders look for these to grow new plants from. Many of the flowers in our gardens came about through such natural mutations.
    This is all so rare and really amazing, Jerry. Thanks for taking us along on a wonderful journey!

    May 5, 2013 at 8:40 am

    • Thanks, for both the nice words and the info. I may not always know what I’m shooting, but I can generally tell if it is something common or not. There was a couple there with a small guide to help them ID the plants there, the ones you identified weren’t in the guide.

      May 5, 2013 at 8:12 pm

  2. What lovely photos. Strangely your close-up shots of the fungi stood out for me due to their sheer starkness.

    Shakti

    May 5, 2013 at 9:42 am

    • Thank you Shakti!

      May 5, 2013 at 8:12 pm

  3. plantsamazeme

    Wow, I was at Aman 8 days ago and there were some trillium just in bud! They have popped out quickly like everything else.
    Your Blue-grey gnatcatcher looks frozen in place, or like he held still for the shot? Do they usually hang out higher in the trees? It is a great time to see the birds right now with the leaves still small. Soon we should see the Scarlet Tanager and the Rose-breasted Grosbeck!

    May 5, 2013 at 11:22 am

    • This warmer weather has kicked things into gear. I was there last weekend, no open trillium, but lots of trout lilies, the trout lilies are done already.

      The blue-grey gnatcatcher never sat still, it was running up and down branches most of the time. I threw out half a dozen photos of it because they were blurred. I’ve seen the grosbeaks, oriels, but no tanagers yet this year.

      May 5, 2013 at 8:16 pm

  4. Your photos are wonderful, a great way to start the day…something beautiful, a little something perfect.

    May 5, 2013 at 11:59 am

    • Thank you Charlie, glad I could start your day off right.

      May 5, 2013 at 8:16 pm

  5. What a treat for you and us.

    May 5, 2013 at 6:00 pm

    • Thanks Tom!

      May 5, 2013 at 8:17 pm

  6. So sorry if you’ve explained this already in the blog but what macro lens are you using (it is a macro, right? The violet seems too small to capture otherwise but maybe I’m wrong?) I just got a macro attachment for my Lumix and really enjoying it. Thx in advance for sharing the info.

    May 5, 2013 at 6:42 pm

    • Well, actually I don’t have a true macro lens yet. I used my 15-85mm lens as that focuses down to one foot to get me close, then cropped the photos a little to get even closer. Have fun with your macro attachment!

      May 5, 2013 at 8:18 pm

  7. I am absolutely in awe at the thick masses of trilliums you have there. In our neck of the woods, spotting the first trillium to bloom is considered enough of an event that it’s featured in the local newspaper! Seems ours are loners and far more shy than yours. How lucky for you!

    May 5, 2013 at 9:05 pm

    • Thanks, it a one of a kind magical place!

      May 5, 2013 at 9:07 pm

  8. What great wildflowers you’ve found Jerry. I had never heard of the double trillium. Love the fungi, what a fun one.

    May 7, 2013 at 8:33 pm

    • Thanks, we have many variations of trillium, but I was a day or two early to catch some of the others, like green and white striped ones.

      May 8, 2013 at 2:50 am