My adventures in the woods, streams, rivers, fields, and lakes of Michigan

Black-and-white Warbler, Mniotilta varia

Note: this post, while published, is a work in progress, as are all posts in this series, My Photo Life List. My goal is to photograph every species of bird that is seen on a regular basis here in Michigan, working from a list compiled by the Michigan chapter of the Audubon Society. This will be a lifelong project, that I began in January of 2013, and as I shoot better photos of this, or any other species, I will update the post for that species with better photos when I can. While this series is not intended to be a field guide per se, my minimum standard for the photos in this series is that one has to be able to make a positive identification of the species in my photos. The information posted here is from either my observations or the Wikipedia, the online free encyclopedia, however, I have personally shot all the photos appearing in this series.

Black-and-white Warbler, Mniotilta varia

The Black-and-white Warbler is a species of New World warbler, the only member of its genus, Mniotilta. It breeds in northern and eastern North America from the Northwest Territory and Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada to Florida. This species is migratory, wintering in Florida, Central America and the West Indies down to Peru.

This species is 14 centimetres (6 in) long and weighs 11 grams (0.39 oz). The summer male Black-and-white Warbler is boldly streaked in black and white, and the bird has been described as a flying humbug. There are two white wing bars. Female and juvenile plumages are similar, but duller and less streaked.

Its song is a high see wee-see wee-see wee-see wee-see wee-see or weesa weesa weetee weetee weetee weet weet weet. It has two calls, a hard tick, and a soft, thin fsss.

The breeding habitat is broadleaved or mixed woodland, preferably in wetter areas. Black-and-white Warblers nest on the ground, laying 4–5 eggs in a cup nest.

This bird feeds on insects and spiders, and unlike other warblers, forages like a nuthatch, moving up and down tree trunks and along branches.

On to my photos:

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black and white warbler

Black and white warbler

Black and white warbler in flight

Black and white warbler in flight

Black and white warbler

Black and white warbler

Black and white warbler

Black and white warbler

This is number 102 in my photo life list, only 248 to go!

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!

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9 responses

  1. What a cute, tiny fellow. I bet he wasn’t easy to catch.

    June 6, 2013 at 3:06 am

    • Thanks, actually, that was one of the easier warblers for me. I was sitting on a log taking a break, and he started hopping around right overhead, I didn’t even have to chase him.

      June 6, 2013 at 3:25 am

  2. He’s a tiny little thing. Must be one of the birds that build the tiny nests that I’ve seen.

    June 6, 2013 at 5:45 am

    • Since I’ve been paying more attention, I see tiny little nests all over the place. It’s hard to tell which tiny little bird is building them all.

      June 6, 2013 at 9:58 am

  3. Shows how beautiful simple black and white can be. No need for flashy colors!

    June 7, 2013 at 8:59 am

    • Thank you, that is so very true.

      June 7, 2013 at 9:58 am

  4. Adorable ! I love these little ones and have only seen one once briefly.

    June 9, 2013 at 9:29 am

    • Thanks, I caught a scattered flock of them passing through, just lucky that day.

      June 9, 2013 at 1:41 pm

      • A flock? Oh my I really am jealous now

        June 9, 2013 at 4:19 pm