My adventures in the woods, streams, rivers, fields, and lakes of Michigan

Michigan’s Early summer flowers

I’ve got quite a few photos of flowers from the past few weeks. My knowledge of wildflowers is severely limited, due to the fact that I haven’t put enough effort into learning about them, so I can’t ID all of these, and I may have gotten some of them wrong. None of my babbling with this post, just photos, enjoy!

White campion

White campion

????

Yarrow

Viburnum???

Viburnum???

???

???

Moth mullien

Moth mullien

White campion

White campion

IMG_5501

Cow vetch

Nightshade

Nightshade

Horsenettle

Horsenettle

Hawkweed

Hawkweed

IMG_7429

Soapwort

???

Soapwort

???

Curly dock

Bindweed

Bindweed

Purple loosestrife ???

Purple loosestrife ???

???

Curly dock

Queen Anne's lace

Queen Anne’s lace

Thistle

Thistle

Sumac

Sumac

Teasel

Teasel

Queen Anne's lace

Queen Anne’s lace

Sweet pea

Sweet pea

Sweet pea

Sweet pea

Knapweed

Knapweed

Knapweed and bee

Knapweed and bee

???

Harebell

Tiger lily

Tiger lily

Thistle

Thistle

Orange berries

Orange berries

Orange berries

Orange berries

Sumac

Sumac

Pokeweed

Pokeweed

Bee balm

Bee balm

Bee balm

Bee balm

Bee balm

Bee balm

Bee balm

Bee balm

Moth mullien

Moth mullien

Bee balm

Bee balm

Bee balm

Bee balm

White chicory

White chicory

Queen Anne's lace

Queen Anne’s lace

???

???

???

???

???

???

Fleabane

Fleabane

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!

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21 responses

  1. I recognize some, but not all of these. the white flowers unfer the hawkweed are soapwort (Saponaria officinalis) also called bouncing bet.
    The viburnums are such a large family of plants that it’s hard to know which is which from photos.
    The blue bell shaped flowers look like harebell (Campanula rotundifolia) and the seed heads look like dock-probably curly dock if the leaves had a twist to them.
    the white flowers 4th up from the bottom look like some type of fruit, but I can’t imagine what would be blooming this late in the season.
    Under that the white flowers look like peppergrass (Lepidium virginicum) but I can’t get close enough to count the stamens.
    The purple flowers under those look like one of the trefoils-possibly tick trefoil. A shot of the leaves and seeds would confirm that.
    I like those orange berries and am guessing Mountain ash.

    July 14, 2013 at 8:51 am

    • Thanks once again! I knew what the soapwort was, I forgot to caption those.

      I knew that the orange berries weren’t mountain ash, they may be a honeysuckle, but I doubt that. I’ve been saving some of these for a month, so you may be right about the one being from a fruit. I have noticed apples and pears growing along the trail I walk, must be there used to be an orchard there, which would account for the flowers.

      Whatever the purple flowers are, those plants are all tangled up in two or three different species of clover, in fact, I’ve been doing double and triple takes all summer because so many plants are growing so close together that it looks like there are the “wrong” flowers on plants that I do know. With the heat and drought last summer, all the plants were thin and scraggley this year they are making up for that. Most of Michigan is one giant green tangle.

      July 14, 2013 at 3:59 pm

  2. I took another look at those berries-definately not Mountain ash!

    July 14, 2013 at 8:53 am

  3. Hi, nice series, and of course some unknown to me. But I am quite sure about the second picture, it must be Achillea millefolium, known commonly as yarrow or common yarrow. It has some medicinal proporties. The bluebell is not a harebell, but I don’t know which campanula it is. The 4th looks like some sort of Malva, which I know only from my garden, and that one is edible. The 4th to the last might be a Philadelphus, which I also only knows from gardens. It has a lovely smell..?

    July 14, 2013 at 9:53 am

    • Thanks for the comment, and for the help!

      July 14, 2013 at 3:23 pm

  4. Ahhh, the beauty of a Michigan summer. Very nice photos. I have not seen any bee balm here yet.

    July 14, 2013 at 10:54 am

    • Thanks Kathy, the bee balm just opened this week, so it shouldn’t be too much longer before it opens there.

      July 14, 2013 at 1:15 pm

  5. Such a profusion of lovelies. Though the morning glory (bindweed) is the bane of my garden here. Ours is a white flower and takes over everything.

    July 14, 2013 at 5:18 pm

    • Thanks, there are white ones around here too, but I thought that the purple was prettier. I’ve heard that it can be a real problem in a garden.

      July 14, 2013 at 5:24 pm

  6. I am the same , I rather just look and enjoy as much as possible rather then putting my nose in the books ..These are all wonderfull flowers , which says more then the name given to some o them 🙂

    July 14, 2013 at 5:32 pm

    • Thank you, I’ve been following your blog for a while now, but have never left a comment, although I like it a great deal.

      July 14, 2013 at 8:25 pm

  7. I vote for the knapweed.

    July 14, 2013 at 5:51 pm

    • Thanks, that one is the leader so far, with one vote.

      July 14, 2013 at 8:26 pm

  8. So much beauty held within such “simple” things! I really like that shot of the nightshade, with the green bulbs slightly blurry behind. All of them are great!

    July 15, 2013 at 3:26 pm

    • Thanks Amy!

      July 16, 2013 at 2:51 am

  9. I think 5325 might be a chickweed. Nice shots BTW!

    July 15, 2013 at 10:05 pm

    • Thank you!

      July 16, 2013 at 2:58 am

  10. What an amazing collection of wildflowers you have captured here. You have enough to create a guide of flowers. Wonderfully done.

    July 18, 2013 at 6:33 pm

    • Thanks, but other commenters made many of the identifications, and I muffed more photos than I posted.

      July 19, 2013 at 2:00 am

  11. Beautiful!

    July 21, 2013 at 8:59 pm

    • Thank you, the flowers did the hard work.

      July 21, 2013 at 11:59 pm