My adventures in the woods, streams, rivers, fields, and lakes of Michigan

Common Yellowthroat, Geothlypis trichas

Note: this post, while published, is a work in progress, as are all posts in this series, My Photo Life List. My goal is to photograph every species of bird that is seen on a regular basis here in Michigan, working from a list compiled by the Michigan chapter of the Audubon Society. This will be a lifelong project, that I began in January of 2013, and as I shoot better photos of this, or any other species, I will update the post for that species with better photos when I can. While this series is not intended to be a field guide per se, my minimum standard for the photos in this series is that one has to be able to make a positive identification of the species in my photos. The information posted here is from either my observations or the Wikipedia, the online free encyclopedia, however, I have personally shot all the photos appearing in this series.

Common Yellowthroat, Geothlypis trichas

The Common Yellowthroat is a New World warbler. They are abundant breeders in North America, ranging from southern Canada to central Mexico. Northern races are migratory, wintering in the southern parts of the breeding range, Central America and the West Indies. Southern forms are largely resident. This species is a very rare vagrant to western Europe.

Common Yellowthroats are small songbirds that have olive backs, wings and tails, yellow throats and chests, and white bellies. Adult males have black face masks which stretch from the sides of the neck across the eyes and forehead, which are bordered above with white or gray. Females are similar in appearance, but have paler underparts and lack the black mask. Immature birds are similar in appearance to the adult female. First-year males have a faint black mask which darkens completely by spring.

The breeding habitats of these birds are marshes and other wet areas with dense low vegetation, and may also be found in other areas with dense shrub. However, these birds are less common in dry areas. Females appear to prefer males with larger masks. Common Yellowthroats nest in low areas of the vegetation, laying 3–5 eggs in a cup-shaped nest. Both parents feed the young.

These birds feed on insects, which are usually captured in dense vegetation, but sometimes caught in midair.

The Common Yellowthroat’s song is a loud twichety twichety twichety twich. Its call is a soft jip.

On to my photos:

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common yellowthroat

Common yellowthroat

Common yellowthroat

Common yellowthroat

This is number 113 in my photo life list, only 237 to go!

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!

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2 responses

  1. There is something about these yellow throats that I just love. Whether it is their coloring or their call. Just love them and can’t get enough of them. They are all over the place here on MDI this week.

    July 18, 2013 at 6:32 pm

    • Thanks, there’s two nesting pairs around here, and they do cheer a person up with their songs and antics.

      July 19, 2013 at 1:59 am