My adventures in the woods, streams, rivers, fields, and lakes of Michigan

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Note: this post, while published, is a work in progress, as are all posts in this series, My Photo Life List. My goal is to photograph every species of bird that is seen on a regular basis here in Michigan, working from a list compiled by the Michigan chapter of the Audubon Society. This will be a lifelong project, that I began in January of 2013, and as I shoot better photos of this, or any other species, I will update the post for that species with better photos when I can. While this series is not intended to be a field guide per se, my minimum standard for the photos in this series is that one has to be able to make a positive identification of the species in my photos. The information posted here is from either my observations or the Wikipedia, the online free encyclopedia, however, I have personally shot all the photos appearing in this series.

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

The Nashville Warbler is a small songbird in the New World warbler family.

Nashville Warblers have olive-brown upperparts, a white belly and a yellow throat and breast; they have a white eye ring, no wing bars and a thin pointed bill. Adult males have a grey head with a rusty crown patch (often not visible); females and immature birds have a duller olive-grey head. The Nashville Warbler is closely related to Virginia’s Warbler, Lucy’s Warbler and Colima Warbler, the four sharing generally similar plumage.

Nashville Warblers breed in open mixed woods and bog habitats in Canada and the northeastern and western United States. Although named after Nashville, Tennessee, the Nashville Warbler only visits that area during migration.

They migrate to southernmost Texas, Mexico and Central America in winter.

They forage in the lower parts of trees and shrubs, frequently flicking their tails; these birds mainly eat insects.

They conceal their open cup-shaped nests on the ground under shrubs.

On to my photos:

 

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

 

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Nashville Warbler, Oreothlypis ruficapilla

This is number 160 in my photo life list, only 190 to go!

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!

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12 responses

  1. What a cute, chubby little mite!

    June 11, 2014 at 1:41 am

    • Thanks! Not to brag, but they look much more colorful in my photos than in the photos on eBird that I used to ID this species.

      June 11, 2014 at 2:45 am

  2. What a pretty little bird and colourful too.

    June 11, 2014 at 4:12 am

    • Thank you Susan!

      June 11, 2014 at 9:56 am

  3. They look like curious little things, as interested in you as you were in them.

    June 11, 2014 at 6:23 am

    • Thanks! Most birds are very curious, sometimes I’m able to use that to get closer to them, but that doesn’t always work.

      June 11, 2014 at 9:58 am

      • I thought you’d get a kick out of this one: http://flyfishingthehighcountry.com/2014/06/01/the-fall-of-man/
        I know-been there, done that!

        June 11, 2014 at 4:02 pm

      • I must be doing something wrong, my most spectacular falls have come when I wasn’t wearing waders.

        June 12, 2014 at 1:43 am

  4. Love the setting of the bird in the mishmash of twigs in the first group. Well done!

    June 11, 2014 at 7:01 am

    • Thanks! But, I had nothing to do with the setting, other than to spot the warbler and start shooting.

      June 11, 2014 at 9:58 am

  5. These are incredibly pictures of a gorgeous bird!

    June 12, 2014 at 10:37 am

    • Thanks Scott, I get lucky once in a while and a bird will pose for me.

      June 12, 2014 at 10:50 am