My adventures in the woods, streams, rivers, fields, and lakes of Michigan

A special D, for Mister T

Since Mr. Tootlepedal said that he was looking forward to more chickadee photos, I’m going to start this post with them.

Black-capped chickadee

Black-capped chickadee

Black-capped chickadee

Black-capped chickadee

Those two images were cropped slightly for composition, these next two weren’t cropped at all. I wish that young birds didn’t vibrate as they beg for food, makes it hard to get a sharp photo of them.

Black-capped chickadee parent feeding its young

Black-capped chickadee parent feeding its young

“Oh boy! Already chewed bug, my favorite, thanks mom!”

Black-capped chickadee parent feeding its young

Black-capped chickadee parent feeding its young

A nuthatch looked on, and I know from reading his blog that Mr. T enjoys a good nuthatch photo, but this one will have to do.

White-breasted nuthatch

White-breasted nuthatch

I caught this juvenile chickadee looking for food on its own.

Black-capped chickadee

Black-capped chickadee

“I’d better watch mom and see how she does it.”

Black-capped chickadee

Black-capped chickadee

“Okay, she grabs one of these things….

Black-capped chickadee

Black-capped chickadee

…holds it with her feet as she pecks it….

Black-capped chickadee

Black-capped chickadee

….oh wow, there’s goodies in here!”

Black-capped chickadee

Black-capped chickadee

“Look mom, I did it all by myself!”

Black-capped chickadee

Black-capped chickadee

Well, that’s it for the chickadees for now, time to move on to other subjects, like this flowering hedge, at least that’s what I think it is.

Flowering hedge?

Flowering hedge?

One of my woodchuck buddies was out in the open.

Woodchuck

Woodchuck

This chipping sparrow was tearing apart any landscape cloth that it could get to for use in a nest.

Chipping sparrow

Chipping sparrow

I was able to get a few shots of a female indigo bunting, but her beautifully colored mate has eluded me so far.

Female indigo bunting

Female indigo bunting

Female indigo bunting

Female indigo bunting

The bee balm has begun to bloom.

Bee balm

Bee balm

Bee balm with requisite bee

Bee balm with requisite bee

As is the Canada thistle. As I was getting ready to shoot this photo, the moth that you can see on the right landed on the flower.

Canada thistle and moth

Canada thistle and moth

But when I moved to get a better shot of the moth, it flew off, so I had to settle for the flower.

Canada thistle

Canada thistle

Both of those were shot with the Tokina macro lens, I switched to the new 10-18 mm lens for this image of Queen Anne’s lace.

Queen Anne's lace

Queen Anne’s lace

Then, switched back to the Tokina for this one.

Queen Anne's lace

Queen Anne’s lace

While I’m on the subject ofย Queen Anne’s lace, it makes a fine umbrella for bugs!

Wasp using Queen Anne's lace as an umbrella in the rain

Wasp using Queen Anne’s lace as an umbrella in the rain

I would say that it’s tough for the bugs to lug around though. ๐Ÿ˜‰

Not all of the red-winged blackbirds have left yet.

Female red-winged blackbird acting like a wife

Female red-winged blackbird acting like a wife

I know, after a caption like that, flowers are required.

Tiger lily in the rain

Tiger lily in the rain

Alfalfa flowers

Alfalfa flowers

Alfalfa flowers

Alfalfa flowers

And, maybe I can get a catbird to sing a love song.

Male grey catbird singing

Male grey catbird singing

This robin looks like it had just visited its barber, and was not pleased with the results.

Juvenile American robin

Juvenile American robin

The milkweed is almost done blooming, but I found a bumblebee on one of the last flowers.

Bumblebee on milkweed flowers

Bumblebee on milkweed flowers

Bumblebee on milkweed flowers

Bumblebee on milkweed flowers

The bull thistle is just opening up.

Bull thistle

Bull thistle

I’m seeing more monarch butterflies than I have over the last several years.

Monarch butterfly

Monarch butterfly

Monarch butterfly

Monarch butterfly

As I stepped out of my apartment door one morning, I was greeted by a flock of geese, and just couldn’t resist playing.

Canada goose portrait

Canada goose portrait

Canada goose eating

Canada goose eating

And, to wrap this up, a few photos of the turkeys on a day when I caught them in the sun for a change.

Turkey

Turkey

Turkey

Turkey

Turkey

Turkey

Turkey

Turkey

I’m sorry that I didn’t write more (you’re probably not), but I went to Muskegon today, got a lifer….

Common Gallinule

Common Gallinule

…a few ho-hum shots of other species, and a few good ones.

Sandhill crane in flight

Sandhill crane in flight

So I’ve been busy sorting and deleting photos since I got back home.

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!

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24 responses

  1. Loverlee!!!

    July 20, 2014 at 9:29 pm

    • Thank you Cindy!

      July 20, 2014 at 9:38 pm

  2. Any day you get to see a Sandhill Crane is an excellent day in my opinion! ๐Ÿ™‚ Good thing you included them flowers! ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

    July 21, 2014 at 1:52 am

    • Thank you! Sandhill cranes have become even more common than eagles around here, but it’s still special to see and hear them.

      July 21, 2014 at 8:59 am

  3. Hmmn….yes, that comment! And yes the flowers were appreciated too! Wonderful close-up of the Canada Goose and Mr T isn’t the only one who likes Chickadees – really good shots.

    July 21, 2014 at 6:30 am

    • Thank you very much Clare! Once winter arrives here, you’ll see a lot more photos of chickadees here, as they are one of the few species of birds that winter here.

      July 21, 2014 at 9:03 am

  4. The odd green flowers look like cypress spurge (Euphorbia cyparissias), which is in a huge family of plants.
    Your woodchucks must be fearless. I never get close enough to them to even think about a photo.
    Great shots of the chickadees and monarch butterflies! That shot of the sandhill crane is nothing to sneeze at either.

    July 21, 2014 at 6:43 am

    • Thanks Allen! I’m more convinced than ever that if you walk the same area everyday that the wildlife learns to recognize you, and becomes used to your presence. But, there’s something else to my being able to get close to critters, the sandhill cranes did a nearly perfect flyby for me yesterday, and they had to have seen me. I was standing right out in the open as they took flight from some distance away, turned and flew right past me at the perfect distance and altitude. It must be karma at work or something, I’m not sure. It’s the same with the turkeys. Most people have to resort to camo and/or blinds, I just walk close to them and shoot away. I shot a macro shot of one this past week. ๐Ÿ™‚

      July 21, 2014 at 9:12 am

  5. Excellent post – so much to smile about here!! I, too, enjoyed the chickadee photos. We didn’t see any this past weekend up north. They don’t need my feeders right now, but they’ll be flocking to them come fall. ๐Ÿ™‚ They are one of my favorites. That sandhill crane photo is pretty great!

    July 21, 2014 at 10:10 am

    • Thank you Amy! Hard to believe that the sandhill crane photo was shot with a “junk” lens, not worth purchasing. ๐Ÿ˜‰

      July 21, 2014 at 1:52 pm

      • Oh, what do “those people” know? Obviously it’s more about the talent behind the camera than the quality of the lens in front. ๐Ÿ™‚

        Hey, I’ve been looking at a set of filters for the Canon SX50 – it’s a pretty good price and comes with a collapsible lens hood, UV filter (which I guess you leave on all the time? The reviews say it helps protect the lens), polarizing filter, adapter ring, etc. It’s priced around $30 and has mostly great reviews on Amazon. Any thoughts? There is a more expensive kit with more stuff (extra lenses) but has a lot more negative reviews – most saying the extra lenses are junk and not worth the money. Just wondering what your advice might be.

        July 21, 2014 at 3:05 pm

      • Thank you Amy! You can’t dismiss the quality of the lens, but I’ll have a lot more to say about that in my next few posts as I throw in a few of the tips and tricks that I’ve learned recently.

        I’ve never looked into filters for a compact digital camera. All I know is that it pays to purchase the highest quality that you can afford. Cheap filters turn good lenses into poor ones, the light has to go through the filter before it gets to the lens. Poor quality filters distort the light that the lens has to work with, and no lens can make up for that. I spent between $50 and $100 for each of the filters I have. A UV filter for each lens, and three polarizing filters for landscapes, and I think that I’m going to end up purchasing even more when I can afford to.

        Other than protecting the front of your lens and making it easier to clean, a UV filter doesn’t really do anything. You’ll find uses for a polarizing filter, I use them often, and not just for landscapes. A polarizing filter also acts as a neutral density filter as they reduce the light coming into the lens. But, I’ll be posting on filters soon.

        July 22, 2014 at 2:51 am

  6. Love the sandhill crane photo…. has me looking forward to winter along the Texas Gulf Coast again. ๐Ÿ™‚

    July 21, 2014 at 2:04 pm

    • Thank you! I can’t wait to see the whoopers again!

      July 22, 2014 at 2:35 am

  7. So many fun shots in there today! Love the chickadees!!! And that groundhog/woodchuck/whateverthevarmint looks like he’s giving you the hairy eyeball…! ๐Ÿ™‚

    July 21, 2014 at 2:09 pm

    • Thanks Lori! The woodchuck was a bit uneasy since I caught it out in the open away from its den.

      July 22, 2014 at 2:36 am

  8. Loved the nuthatch pictures particularly.

    July 21, 2014 at 5:15 pm

    • Thank you Susan!

      July 22, 2014 at 2:38 am

  9. Thank you for the chickadees and the nuthatch but the sandhill crane trumped them all today.

    July 21, 2014 at 7:51 pm

    • Thank you, and you’re welcome, I look forward to posting more of all of them soon.

      July 22, 2014 at 2:39 am

  10. Nenkin Seikatsu

    I came across your text, “…acting like a wife”, as I took a sip of my coffee. I may have almost choked to death, but had I done so, I would have died with a smile on my face.
    Thank you.

    July 24, 2014 at 6:53 am

    • Thank you, I’ll be more careful in the future, I wouldn’t want any one to die because of my blog. ๐Ÿ˜‰

      July 24, 2014 at 8:29 am

  11. Incredibly beautiful photos.Best regards.

    July 26, 2014 at 10:40 pm

    • Thank you very much!

      July 26, 2014 at 10:44 pm