My adventures in the woods, streams, rivers, fields, and lakes of Michigan

I see you, now what do I do?

A couple of posts ago, I speculated that I could do an entire post or two on playing peek-a-boo with birds, where they spot me trying to photograph them, they attempt to hide behind whatever is handy, and when they find that I still keep shooting, the birds take off.

On the other hand, there are some birds that when they see me shooting their photo will pose for me instead of moving on. As I speculated in the past, it may be the bird equivalent of a selfie.

Well, I’m going to continue that theme for this post, and probably the next one that I do about my daily walks around home, which is the focus of this post by the way. I’m still way behind in my blogging, so it may be a while before I get around to another post from around home.

Anyway, I’ll start with a tufted titmouse, mostly because it surprised me to find it where it was. They spend most of their time in wooded areas, and towards the tops of trees. Every once in a while I’ll see them lower, even on the ground, but seldom out in an open field like this.

Tufted titmouse

Tufted titmouse

Well, fairly open field, there are a few bushes in the field, but no real trees. I took a few steps closer for this one, which I composed as I did as a bit of an artsy image.

Tufted titmouse

Tufted titmouse

I got serious about getting an image to crop, but the 300 mm prime lens began acting up, and would not focus on the titmouse, even though it was posing nicely for me.

Tufted titmouse

Tufted titmouse

Eventually, it grew tired of my fooling around, and shot me that impatient bird look, letting me know that he was tired of posing when I couldn’t take advantage of it.

Tufted titmouse

Tufted titmouse

Next up, a white-breasted nuthatch. They typically pay no attention to me when I’m trying to shot a photo of them, they continue to go on about their business of looking for food.

White-breasted nuthatch

White-breasted nuthatch

When they do pose, it’s either like this….

White-breasted nuthatch

White-breasted nuthatch

…or this.

White-breasted nuthatch

White-breasted nuthatch

Most robins are more than willing to pose.

Juvenile American robin

Juvenile American robin

We’ll take a little break from the birds for a while for a few flowers.

Asters

Asters

Asters

Asters

Aster

Aster

Picking up on another theme, a couple of the last summer flowers of the year.

Spotted knapweed

Spotted knapweed

Woodland sunflower?

Woodland sunflower?

Now then, back to the birds, and a rotten little bugger at that. I spotted a ruby-crowned kinglet out in the open, but I could tell that it was going to take off on me, so I shot too quickly to get a good photo.

Ruby-crowned kinglet

Ruby-crowned kinglet

Sure enough, it was gone before I could shoot a better one. I tracked the kinglet down in a pine tree…

Ruby-crowned kinglet

Ruby-crowned kinglet

…but the light was horrible there, so I got ahead of the kinglet to wait for it to come to me, I shot too quickly again…

Ruby-crowned kinglet

Ruby-crowned kinglet

…I got the focus right, and the camera and lens steady, the kinglet ducked….

Ruby-crowned kinglet

Ruby-crowned kinglet

…and then decided to move on…

Ruby-crowned kinglet

Ruby-crowned kinglet

…I was too quick yet again…

Ruby-crowned kinglet

Ruby-crowned kinglet

…the kinglet spotted me…

Ruby-crowned kinglet

Ruby-crowned kinglet

…and was off again…

Ruby-crowned kinglet

Ruby-crowned kinglet

…I have another set of photos much like these, but I won’t bore you with them. Sometimes though, a bird not wanting to be photographed can get me a good photo if I try hard enough.

Ruby-crowned kinglet

Ruby-crowned kinglet

We’ll take another short break from the birds for a few other things, like these milkweed seeds.

Milkweed seeds

Milkweed seeds

I almost hate to post that one, because a week or two later, I got some real winners of milkweed seeds, but you’ll have to wait for them. πŸ˜‰

I used the new EX 320 flash unit for this next one, totally on a lark, but it worked better than I expected.

Sumac

Sumac

I don’t remember why I decided to try the flash, there must have been a reason that I did, but I can’t put my finger on it.

I deleted the image of the sumac without the flash, there’s no reason to post it other than to show how much the flash did improve that image, so, you’ll have to take my word for it. Instead, here’s another image of sumac.

Sumac

Sumac

This red squirrel was barking away at something, I tried to catch it with its mouth open, but missed.

Red squirrel

Red squirrel

In the low light at the time, the squirrel’s barking was enough movement to make that image less sharp than I would have liked. On the other hand, there was no movement from this grasshopper at all.

Grasshopper just hanging out

Grasshopper just hanging out

Back to the birds, this time, a common yellowthroat that saw me sneaking up on him…

Common yellowthroat

Common yellowthroat

…turned….

Common yellowthroat

Common yellowthroat

…and struck a pose.

Common yellowthroat

Common yellowthroat

Here’s a white-throated sparrow…

White-throated sparrow

White-throated sparrow

…when it noticed me taking its picture…

White-throated sparrow

White-throated sparrow

..it struck a pose to show every one how it got its name.

White-throated sparrow

White-throated sparrow

Here’s a song sparrow that was posing for me…

Song sparrow

Song sparrow

…until it spotted some food…

Song sparrow

Song sparrow

…then, it was off!

Song sparrow

Song sparrow

Speaking of food, when birds slow down to eat, it’s a good time to get a good photo of them, like this Nashville warbler eating an insect…

Nashville warbler

Nashville warbler

…I swear, this was a burp…

Nashville warbler

Nashville warbler

…at least the warbler had the manners to say “Excuse me”.

Nashville warbler

Nashville warbler

I’ll have more on birds eating in my next post from around home, for right now, I’m going to end this one with an image of a palm warbler, just because I can.

Palm warbler

Palm warbler

I still have three posts to do on my weekend trips, and 150 images from around home to get around to posting one of these days, not all at once though. πŸ˜‰ It would be rather slow as far as the number of photos that I’m shooting, except for the foliage right now. It’s near peak color time, so I’ve been busy. You may be seeing fall foliage images into December, not that it would be all bad. πŸ˜‰

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!

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30 responses

  1. Thanks a million for providing beauty and knowledge together:)

    October 18, 2014 at 11:44 pm

    • Thank you very much! I’m glad you enjoyed it.

      October 18, 2014 at 11:48 pm

  2. Lovely post.

    October 18, 2014 at 11:53 pm

    • Thank you!

      October 18, 2014 at 11:55 pm

  3. What a great selection of shots! I loved the tufted titmouse ones and laughed at its impatient expression. The milkweed shot is good too – I look forward to the next ones.

    October 19, 2014 at 3:54 am

    • Thank you very much Clare!

      October 19, 2014 at 8:06 pm

  4. Splendid shots, I particularly enjoyed the squirrel.

    October 19, 2014 at 4:39 am

    • Thank you Susan!

      October 19, 2014 at 8:06 pm

  5. Very nice Common Yellowthroat!

    October 19, 2014 at 6:10 am

    • Thank you very much Bob!

      October 19, 2014 at 8:06 pm

  6. You got some great shots of all these little birds. I like the tufted titmouse-I’ve never seen one for real. You don’t get to see barking squirrels very often either!
    That could be a woodland sunflower but I’m not sure. I usually stay away from yellow sunflower types because there are so many and they can be hard to identify.

    October 19, 2014 at 8:05 am

    • Thank you Allen! I would assume that titmice are present in New Hampshire, but you usually have to look up to see them. Maybe you need a bird feeder in the garden to attract a few birds. πŸ˜‰

      October 19, 2014 at 8:12 pm

      • You know me, I’m usually looking at the ground for plants, fungi and slime molds. Mostly because colorblindness means that I can’t see most birds in trees. A bird feeder would be a great help in spotting and identifying birds but the bears take them down as fast as we can put them up. I’ve had bears in my back yard twice now and I’d rather not have them on the deck. They’re big!

        October 19, 2014 at 8:38 pm

      • I don’t blame you, I wouldn’t want to bump into one in the dark either.

        October 19, 2014 at 8:58 pm

  7. Can’t wait to see the upcoming milkweed shots. I could feel the silky texture in this one – it was my favorite of the bunch. Love your storytelling through a sequence of shots. Belching birds?

    October 19, 2014 at 8:14 am

    • Thanks Judy!The next milkweed seeds involve dew and sunlight, I think you’ll like them. And yes, I went back to telling how I get my photos rather than where for a while, I change from time to time. Most critters belch, we just don’t see or hear it.

      October 19, 2014 at 8:16 pm

  8. Fabulous set of photographs.

    October 19, 2014 at 1:20 pm

    • Thank you Simon!

      October 19, 2014 at 8:16 pm

  9. Such a fun photo album…I actually looked through it several times constantly changing my chosen favorites.

    October 19, 2014 at 3:24 pm

    • Thank you very much Charlie!

      October 19, 2014 at 8:17 pm

  10. I liked the milkweed seeds.

    Considering how bad conditions always are and how unhelpful your birds subjects are, it is amazing that somehow or other, you manage to pack your posts with very watchable pictures. Keep suffering, we like the results.

    October 19, 2014 at 6:11 pm

    • Thanks Tom! I may be overstating how bad things go at times, you’re not the only person adept at moaning. πŸ˜‰

      October 19, 2014 at 8:18 pm

  11. So many terrific shots in this post — especially the series of the tufted titmouse. I have a slew of them coming to my feeders right now. They always bring me a lot of joy. Loved the “irritated face” shot. LOL Also, I was thinking how awesome that milkweed photo was and then you said you have even BETTER ones awaiting – can’t wait to see those!

    October 19, 2014 at 8:32 pm

  12. Amazing nature ,beauty to behold.The pictures are so vivid. Regards.Jalal

    October 19, 2014 at 8:57 pm

    • Thank you very Much Jalal!

      October 19, 2014 at 9:03 pm

  13. I wonder if birds like the names we humans gave them…. thanks for these lovely pix.

    October 20, 2014 at 3:55 pm

    • Thank you Cynthia! I don’t think the birds care at all what names we give them.

      October 21, 2014 at 3:09 am

  14. Was the Tufted titmouse hanging out with the White-breasted nuthatch? They usually do kind of flock together, especially in winter. Maybe he was just along for the ride? Also, love that milkweed shot. Have you seen more Monarchs this year? We’ve only be getting a few here and there.

    October 22, 2014 at 1:54 pm

    • Thanks Lori! The titmouse was in the same general area as the nuthatch, if I remember correctly, it’s been a while since I shot them. I’ve got better milkweed images coming, and far too many of monarchs saved as well, I just need time to get around to posting them.

      October 22, 2014 at 2:45 pm

      • Go for it!!! πŸ™‚

        October 22, 2014 at 3:39 pm