My adventures in the woods, streams, rivers, fields, and lakes of Michigan

Finally, Flowers

I’m going to finally get around to doing the post that I promised last week, nearly all flowers. But, I have to start with one bird photo, just to keep the streak alive. 😉

Male American goldfinch eating thistle seeds

Male American goldfinch eating thistle seeds

Besides, there are flowers in that photo, even if they’re out of focus. 😉

Okay, for the real flowers, these were shot over the course of the summer, with either the Canon 100 mm macro lens on a 60D body, or the Canon 300 mm L series lens, 1.4X tele-converter, and on the 7D Mk II body. They’re both great set-ups for flowers, the 100 mm lens makes it easier to get the exact angle that I want, if I can get close to the flower. The 300 mm lens and tele-converter gets the larger flowers without cropping, or I may have had to crop some of these because fences, water, or other obstacles prevented me from getting as close as I would have liked. There’s not much else to say, so here goes.

Purple loosestrife

Purple loosestrife

 

Pokeweed

Pokeweed

 

Pink

Pink

 

Sumac

Sumac

 

Asiatic dayflower

Asiatic day flower

 

Asiatic dayflower

Asiatic day flower

 

Boneset

Boneset

 

Unknown purple

Unknown purple

 

Nature's flower garden

Nature’s flower garden

 

Mother's wort

Mother’s wort

 

Ox-eye daisy

Ox-eye daisy

 

Sulpher cinquefoil

Sulphur cinquefoil

 

Queen Anne's lace

Queen Anne’s lace

 

Queen Anne's lace

Queen Anne’s lace

 

Creeping bellflower

Creeping bellflower

 

Creeping bellflower

Creeping bellflower

 

Creeping bellflower

Creeping bellflower

JVIS8479

Horsemint?

 

Horsemint?

Horsemint?

 

Pickerel weed

Pickerel weed

 

Pickerel weed

Pickerel weed

 

Ironweed

Ironweed

 

Ragweed

Ragweed

 

 

Unknown grass

Unknown grass

 

 

Soapwort

Soapwort

 

Goldenrod

Goldenrod

 

Jewellweed

Jewelweed

 

Jewellweed

Jewelweed

 

Day lily

Day lily

 

Enchanter's nightshade

Enchanter’s nightshade

 

Sweet pea

Sweet pea

 

Great lobelia

Great lobelia

 

Evening primrose

Evening primrose

 

Rose of Sharon

Rose of Sharon

 

Rose of Sharon

Rose of Sharon

 

Goldenrod

Goldenrod

 

Ground ivy?

Ground ivy?

 

Dame's rocket

Dame’s rocket

 

Yellow hawkweed?

Yellow hawkweed?

 

Bindweed

Bindweed

Some of the photos are only fair, but a few are pretty good as well. I’m feeling pretty proud of myself, not because of the images, but only a few of these are unidentified. Lightroom has a database for keywords, and when I’m able to identify a flower, I add the species name to the keywords. I also put the color and size in the keywords, along with unidentified if I can’t ID it. I use four sizes, tiny, for flowers less than 1/2 inch across. Small for flowers from 1 to 2 inches across. Medium, for flowers 2 to 3 inches across, and large for flowers larger than 3 inches.

If I see a flower on some one else’s blog that matches one of my unidentified flowers, I can easily look it up in Lightroom by color and size, then replace the word “Unidentified” with the species name in the keywords, and it’s saved forever, all I have to do is look them up again if I forget their name. It works well for me so far.

Here’s a photo tip, or really, a photo editing tip. If your camera has trouble exposing certain color(s) of flowers, often it is yellow or red, or both, instead of lowering the exposure, try lowering the luminance for that color in Lightroom if you have that to edit photos. That’s how I got the evening primrose to look as good as it did in that photo. Lowering the luminance for just the color that looks overexposed leaves anything else in the frame, such as leaves, exposed correctly.

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!

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30 responses

  1. You excelled yourself today, loved all the colourful flowers and the colourful bird, no room for squirrels or chipmunks not colourful enough!

    September 3, 2015 at 4:22 pm

    • Thank you very much Susan! I’ll have some squirrels and possibly other fuzzy critters in the next post.

      September 3, 2015 at 4:43 pm

  2. Wonderful shots all, but I like the sweet pea the best.

    September 3, 2015 at 4:46 pm

    • Thank you very much! They are one of my favorite flowers, I have a hard time stopping myself from doing an entire post of just them.

      September 3, 2015 at 11:55 pm

  3. Really gorgeous, Jerry! I love the detail you got in the shot of the Enchanter’s Nightshade and the way you have shot it horizontally too. The back-lit Bindweed and the Jewelweed with the raindrop on it – wonderful!

    September 3, 2015 at 5:55 pm

    • Thank you very much Clare! I’ve been working very hard to improve all my photos, but especially flowers. They’re so beautiful that they deserve to be photographed as well as one can.

      September 3, 2015 at 11:56 pm

      • Yes, so true. I think some of your shots of flowers are exquisite and all are very good.

        September 4, 2015 at 6:32 pm

  4. Your lenses are getting a real workout, especially on things like the tiny enchanter’s nightshade which came out beautifully.
    I don’t think I’ve ever seen horsemint so that’s a tough one. I think the ground ivy is correct though.
    I think the unknown purple flower is a mint, possibly water mint (Mentha aquatic) or spear mint (Mentha spicata.)
    All in all quite a bouquet! You’re getting much better at identifying them too. If only I would with birds.

    September 3, 2015 at 5:59 pm

    • Thank you very much Allen! I’m not really getting better at identifying flowers, I rely mostly on your blog, then as I said, label the flower photos I shoot in Lightroom, or I’d never remember which flower is which. I believe that the unknown purple flower is spearmint, a quick web search tells me that from the growth habits of the plants and where I found those flowers, that it’s probably not water mint. There are so many plants in the mint family, I spent several hours on the web looking at a few of them to tentatively ID the one plant as horsemint, but I’m never positive when I do web searches.

      September 4, 2015 at 12:12 am

  5. Good editing tip.

    September 3, 2015 at 6:07 pm

    • Thanks Tom! It’s only a good tip if it works for you.

      September 3, 2015 at 11:57 pm

  6. A celebration of flowers! The Mother’s wort is not one I’m familiar with.

    September 3, 2015 at 6:19 pm

    • Thank you Bob! I wish that I could have gotten a good close up of the mother’s wort, but they’re tiny little flowers.

      September 3, 2015 at 11:58 pm

  7. Wow, Jerry! What a great collection. I love the drama of the tight focus with the mysterious-looking backgrounds. Not picking a favorite, but would be proud to claim any of these as my own. Nice work. There are some real beauties in this group.

    September 3, 2015 at 6:48 pm

    • Thank you very much Judy! I working to develop my own style when it comes to flowers, so that you can see the entire flower sharp and in focus, but with no distracting background. That isn’t always possible, but I try.

      September 4, 2015 at 12:00 am

  8. Glorious shots, Jerry. Loved the vibrant colours and the details. It’s too difficult to pick favourites really but I’ll choose the Ironweed, Mother’s Wort and Sumac as ones that most interested me. I don’t think I have seen them here. I like the delicate photos just as much as the “in your face” dazzlers. It’s a lovely diverse collection. 🙂

    September 4, 2015 at 1:59 am

    • Thank you very much Jane! I’ve been lucky the past few months, several times I’ve been in the right place at the right time to catch flowers with very dramatic lighting. The rest of the time, I let nature dictate how I will shoot the flowers, the light and color of the flower are what I go by. I know that the current fad is to shoot flowers with the aperture nearly wide open and only a small part of the flower sharp, but that isn’t my style. I want to see the flowers as they are.

      September 4, 2015 at 4:20 pm

  9. A fantastic collection of wildflowers Jerry. Not an easy task to discover all of these. Of course, the goldfinch has to be my favorite. BTW, a pro-flower photog that I’ve taken workshops with prefers that as much of the flower is in focus. So there you go!

    September 4, 2015 at 8:29 pm

    • Thank you very much Emily! It’s nice to know that I’m not the only one who isn’t infatuated with shooting at f/1.2 all the time. Not that I have a lens that fast, or would even want one.

      September 5, 2015 at 12:20 am

      • f/1.2 gives you NOTHING ! Even at 5.6 I don’t see enough in focus. f/16 is more like it baby. 🙂 But flowers in the breeze, not easy to do without boosting that ISO. 🙂

        September 5, 2015 at 6:46 am

      • With the macro lens, I shoot between f/11 and f/16, ISO between 100 and 200, never higher. Yes, I’ve learned a few tricks to dealing with the wind. With the 300 mm lens and tele-converter, I do go higher on the ISO, mostly because my tricks won’t work with that set-up.

        September 5, 2015 at 12:23 pm

      • An unorthodox technique I often use for dealing with the wind when I’m shooting macros with the 100mm lens is to hold the subject still with my left hand and take the picture with my right, which also usually presses the camera against my forehead for extra stability. I set the shutter speed to 1/400 sec. or faster.

        September 13, 2015 at 7:42 am

      • Thanks again Steve! What sometimes works for me is holding the stalk of the flower with my left hand, then resting the lens hood of my macro lens on my left fore-arm to help steady the camera. Doesn’t always work though.

        September 13, 2015 at 6:59 pm

      • Resting the lens hood on your left forearm sounds like a good approach. Nothing works all the time, but we try to tilt the odds more in our favor.

        September 13, 2015 at 7:57 pm

    • I’ve noticed that many people will ooh and aah over almost any picture with most parts of it out of focus.

      September 13, 2015 at 7:37 am

      • Thank you Steve! I’ve shot thousands of photos with very little in focus, and deleted them all, not my style.

        September 13, 2015 at 6:57 pm

  10. A lovely gallery of flora.

    September 5, 2015 at 2:48 pm

    • Thank you very much Gunta!

      September 5, 2015 at 4:34 pm

  11. I am so envious of your goldfinch photo!!! I keep trying to time being outside with the telephoto lens when I think they might show up but I swear they wait for me to go back inside before they come back to the sunflowers!!! PS, Lovely flower pix, too!

    September 7, 2015 at 8:16 am

    • Thank you very much Lori! This time of the year it should be easy to sneak up on a goldfinch, all they do is eat.

      September 7, 2015 at 1:41 pm