My adventures in the woods, streams, rivers, fields, and lakes of Michigan

Using them up

I still have photos that I shot back in May of this year saved on my computer that I’ve been meaning to post here. Many of them are of poorer quality, but they are of subjects that are either interesting, or that I seldom see, for the most part. So, I think that it’s time that I used a few of them up, to make room for more, and hopefully, better photos in the future. I’ll start with this one.

Unidentified dragonfly

Unidentified dragonfly

Next up, a chipmunk from back in May…

Eastern Chipmunk

Eastern Chipmunk

…and here’s one from August.

Hanging in there

Hanging in there

This photo was also shot back in August, on a rainy morning, so the quality isn’t the greatest.

Unidentified fly object

Unidentified fly object

On the other end of the spectrum, this was shot in June, early in the morning.

June sunrise

June sunrise

That same morning, I also shot this one.

Bumblebee on dead nettle

Bumblebee on horse nettle

This one is rather recent, it was shot in October.

Ruby-crowned kinglet

Ruby-crowned kinglet

These next two date back to July of this year.

Whitetail deer

Whitetail deer

 

Grey squirrel in the sunlight

Grey squirrel in the sunlight

Aha! I have found the folder were I had saved these two to.

Unidentified flowering objects

Unidentified flowering objects

This one is of the largest single fungus that I have ever seen, it was 18 inches (45 cm) long and a foot (30 cm) wide!

Unidentified fungal object

Unidentified fungal object

I had to retreat to get the entire thing in the frame.

Here’s a lesser scaup taking flight on a rainy day back in June.

Lesser scaup taking flight

Lesser scaup taking flight

Also from June, two photos of a coastal duck that breeds in the subarctic, a Black Scoter. They have not been well-studied in North America, only a few nests have ever been found.

Juvenile black scoter

Juvenile black scoter

 

Juvenile black scoter

Juvenile black scoter

And also from June, a first summer male orchard oriole.

First summer male orchard oriole

First summer male orchard oriole

July 26th must have been my first time out with the Canon 2 X teleconverter, as I have a few photos left over from that date as I was testing it out.

Sandhill cranes

Sandhill cranes

 

Pie-billed grebe

Pie-billed grebe

 

Female yellow warbler

Female yellow warbler

 

Female yellow warbler

Female yellow warbler

 

Eastern kingbird

Eastern kingbird

 

Male indigo bunting

Male indigo bunting

 

Male indigo bunting

Male indigo bunting

I shoot way too many photos of fox squirrels, but I can’t help myself. They have so much personality. They are like mallards in a way, always fun to watch as they gather acorns…

Fox squirrel gathering acorns

Fox squirrel gathering acorns

…carefully bury their prizes…

Fox squirrel burying an acorn

Fox squirrel burying an acorn

…go off to look for more…

Fox squirrel

Fox squirrel

…then warn photographers to stay away from their nuts.

Fox squirrel

Fox squirrel

Oh, by the way, I didn’t mean to imply that mallards gather and bury acorns, just that fox squirrels and mallards both exude personality. Speaking of mallards…

Mother mallard

Mother mallard

 

Mallard chick

Mallard chick

 

Mallard chick

Mallard chick

…and here’s a couple of other mother ducks and their broods.

Female northern shoveler

Female northern shoveler

 

Female northern shoveler and ducklings

Female northern shoveler and ducklings

 

Blue winged teal

Blue winged teal

 

Blue winged teal

Blue winged teal

Hmm, I didn’t post very many photos of young birds this summer, I’ll have to make up for it with these shots of a young tufted titmouse letting its parents know that it’s hungry.

Juvenile tufted titmouse

Juvenile tufted titmouse

 

Juvenile tufted titmouse

Juvenile tufted titmouse

 

Juvenile tufted titmouse

Juvenile tufted titmouse

I have way too many photos saved, I’ve just getting started in this post, and I’ve already hitting my self-imposed limit for the number of photos. Even at that limit, it’s more than some people would prefer. I suppose that I could have left out the series of the fox squirrel, but I liked those photos, and I run this blog. 😉

I should note that over the course of the summer as these were shot is the period of time when I transitioned from optimizing my images to post here, to optimizing them to appear their best as seen full screen on my computer. On my old computer with the small display, I would crop many photos a lot more, since they looked fine that way on that computer or here on my blog. But, on the iMac with the large display, cropping images as much as I used leaves them looking quite bad as far as sharpness. While the images look great on my computer, the subject is often very small in the versions of my photos that I post now. So, I should apologize to every one who follows my blog and takes the time to comment.

I’m working on that, trying to get even closer to my subjects than I have in the past, but it isn’t easy. I can’t tell you how many photo opportunities I’ve missed by trying to get better photos, either a bit closer, or changing the angle at which I’m shooting to avoid getting distractions in the frame. But, that also means that I don’t force you to see as many of the same old, same old photos, like a robin eating sumac drupes.

American robin eating sumac

American robin eating sumac

 

American robin eating sumac

American robin eating sumac

If I left those out, I’d have more room here for birds that aren’t seen as often, such as this snow bunting.

Snow bunting

Snow bunting

 

Snow bunting

Snow bunting

That’s always a dilemma for me, which photos to post, and which ones do I leave out. So, at least for the time being, I’ll keep on plugging away as I have been.

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!

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23 responses

  1. Always pleasure to look at your pictures!

    November 14, 2015 at 8:42 pm

    • Thank you very much!

      November 14, 2015 at 10:16 pm

  2. Squirrels standing on two legs, UFOs (unidentified fungal objects), and insect close-ups. This post has it all. Happy that you dug into the archives for these photos – insect photos will be scarce for the next few months.

    November 14, 2015 at 10:11 pm

    • Thank you very much Judy! Squirrels stand on two legs all the time, what got me were the expressions on its face. I didn’t see as many dragonflies or butterflies this summer as I hoped that I would, but I do have a few left to use up.

      November 14, 2015 at 10:19 pm

  3. No apologies needed, I loved all those squirrel pictures, cleverly shot.

    November 15, 2015 at 3:15 am

    • Thank you very much Susan! Hopefully, I’ve gotten more clever as time has gone by. 😉

      November 15, 2015 at 8:27 am

  4. Loved this mixed collection of mainly critters. Maybe there are two species of similar birds we have here? The indigo buntings are a gorgeous blue and that fungus is a whopper! Your furry critters are completely adorable too. Please continue to “use up” your old pics, Jerry! They are excellent. 🙂

    November 15, 2015 at 4:33 am

    • Thank you very much Jane! When it comes to critters, I have a knack for being in the right place at the right time, and catching them in action. The photos aren’t always perfect, but at least I’m able to see and photograph things most people never see.

      November 15, 2015 at 8:29 am

  5. Nothing like a little house cleaning! It would be a shame to waste all of those photos.
    I think the white flowers are some type of anemone, possibly wood anemone (Anemone quinquefolia) but they all look more or less the same.
    The huge fungus I think is a dryad’s saddle (Polyporus squamosus.) They can get pretty big.
    You can’t beat squirrel and duck shots! That fox squirrel in the last shot looks like he wanted to wrestle!

    November 15, 2015 at 8:24 am

    • Thanks Allen! And thanks to Lightroom, I went back and entered your identifications into the keywords for the fungus and flowers, so hopefully, you won’t have to ID them again for me. 😉

      I tell myself not to shoot any more photos of mallards or fox squirrels as I have more than enough of them, but they’re always up to something and the expressions on their faces can be priceless.

      November 15, 2015 at 8:39 am

  6. Back in the days of film deciding what pictures to save/use wasn’t as big a problem

    November 15, 2015 at 9:59 am

    • Thanks Bob! Obviously you weren’t around while I was sorting through the thousands of photos I shot back then. 😉

      November 15, 2015 at 10:20 pm

  7. I love the variety of shots – insects, birds, sunlight through trees, animals, plants! I had never noticed before what a lovely shade of brown a mallard’s eyes are! Thanks very much Jerry!

    November 15, 2015 at 3:32 pm

    • Thank you very much Clare! I found out today that pekin ducks have pretty blue eyes, as you’ll see soon.

      November 15, 2015 at 10:23 pm

      • That sounds good!

        November 16, 2015 at 5:50 pm

  8. Your whole series is such fun and so interesting to review.

    November 15, 2015 at 4:39 pm

    • Thank you very much Charlie!

      November 15, 2015 at 10:23 pm

  9. I enjoy all of them, Jerry. I think the snow bunting may be my favorite of this set. The plumage of the bird against the silvery-white background is quite striking.

    I got an unexpected photo last night of a young nutria feeding on fallen apples. I had spotted a 4-point black-tailed deer buck under the apple trees, and went out to investigate, as I thought it was the same one who has been demolishing my blueberry bushes with antler scraping at night. Something started grunting and snuffling loudly near me, and I saw a small grey form lunge at me in the half-lighting from the porch lamp. I hightailed it and grabbed a flashlight and camera, and caught a grumpy youngster nutria under an apple tree. Not terribly afraid of me, and irritated that I had disturbed his feeding session! Not the greatest photo I took, but it was good enough to identify him on the ODFW site. I don’t think you have them where you are, at least not yet…
    http://www.dfw.state.or.us/wildlife/living_with/nutria.asp
    In the 12 years we have been here, we have on;y seen one other, a large adult passing through during daylight hours.

    November 15, 2015 at 4:41 pm

    • Thank you very much Lavinia! No the nutria haven’t made it here, and probably won’t from what I’ve read. They couldn’t handle our harsh winters.

      November 15, 2015 at 10:26 pm

  10. Well, I have only have a small monitor so if you go on posting the cropped shots, it won’t bother me! Another great selection of pictures and I sympathise with the lure of familiar subjects. They are only familiar because they make such good pictures so keep on showing us ducks and squirrels.

    November 15, 2015 at 5:57 pm

    • Thank you very much Tom! I took your advice to heart, even before I read your comment. No squirrels today, but lots of gulls, ducks, and a few eagles.

      November 15, 2015 at 10:25 pm

  11. Hilarious squirrel photos!!! And, yes, they sure do have a lot of personality just like ducks! Thx for sharing!

    November 17, 2015 at 9:02 am

    • Thank you Lori! Watching squirrels and ducks in action can keep me occupied for hours.

      November 17, 2015 at 10:43 am