My adventures in the woods, streams, rivers, fields, and lakes of Michigan

Serving up some leftovers

I’m still trying to use up photos that I have shot this summer but haven’t gotten around to posting yet. It’s been a very good summer for photography, despite the fact that Saturdays have been the rainiest, cloudiest day of the week this summer. Isn’t that the way that it always goes?

Even though we had a dry spell early in the summer, the drought broke before it affected the flowers to any degree.

Iris

Iris

 

Burdock flower

Burdock flower

 

Solomen seal?

Solomon seal?

Well, I’ve ordered the Canon 100-400 mm L series lens, and it should arrive on Monday. Wouldn’t you know, I have a three-day weekend this week due to the fact that my dedicated run at work is changing, and the new lens will arrive about the time that I have to go to bed on Monday. Oh well.

I have high hopes for this new lens, especially after the tribulations that I went through last weekend trying to photograph smaller birds in the woods. The 300 mm lens with a tele-converter behind it does fine on birds out in the open when they sit still long enough for that combination to focus on the birds.

Barn swallow

Barn swallow

 

Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

However, at both the wastewater facility and the Muskegon Lake Nature Preserve, the slow focusing of that set-up really hit home, again. If you remember, I got so frustrated with the its slow focusing when I was on vacation this spring that I switched over and used the Beast (Sigma 150-500 mm lens) whenever I was walking through heavily wooded areas. That’s one of the reasons that you haven’t seen many shots like this over the summer.

White-breasted nuthatch

White-breasted nuthatch

Even though I worked very hard for these photos, they’re not really very good, not up to my current standards for photos. However, they are photos of species of birds that I haven’t posted any photos of lately, so rather than bore you with yet another image of a turkey vulture in flight…

Turkey vulture in flight

Turkey vulture in flight

…I’ll bore you with poor photos of smaller birds.

Black-capped chickadee waving goodbye

Black-capped chickadee waving goodbye

 

Brown thrasher

Brown thrasher

 

Willow flycatcher

Willow flycatcher

I’ve seen this species of warbler several times now, but it’s always been a female or juvenile male, I’ve never caught a male in breeding plumage yet.

Female or juvenile Blackpoll warbler

Female or juvenile Blackpoll warbler

And, the only way that I could make a positive identification of which species it was is because of this even worse photo, which shows the bird’s wing bars.

Female or juvenile Blackpoll warbler

Female or juvenile Blackpoll warbler

I tried very hard for a better photo of this wren, but it stayed well hidden most of the time. I have several photos of it peering at me through the leaves that I won’t bore you with.

Sedge wren

Sedge wren

It’s so much easier when the birds perch out in the open.

Dickcissel

Dickcissel

Or at least in some better light.

Red-eyed vireo

Red-eyed vireo

This catbird was eating the berries that you can see, but the bird turned its back every single time it plucked one of the berries, as if it didn’t want me to see what it was eating.

Grey catbird

Grey catbird

I’ve heard more of these guys this summer than ever, yet all that I have to show is this very poor photo of one. That’s hardly fitting of the joy that they given me through their almost constant serenades.

Warbling vireo

Warbling vireo

I think that it’s interesting that I find that fast auto-focusing is more important to me while I’m photographing small birds in the woods than I do when photographing large birds in flight.

American crow in flight

American crow in flight

Since I’m serving up leftovers, here’s the rest of the photos from last Sunday.

Northern shovelers in flight

Northern shovelers in flight

The new 100-400 mm lens that I ordered focuses even closer than the 300 mm lens that I used for these next few, so I shouldn’t have to crop as much as I did these images.

Unidentified bug

Unidentified bug

You can see how little depth of field that there is though.

 

Spider

Spider

 

Dragonfly

Dragonfly

 

Dragonfly

Dragonfly

 

Smartweed?

Smartweed?

 

Dog enjoying a boat ride

Dog enjoying a boat ride

I couldn’t resist that last one, the dog was acting as the look out on the bow of the boat and was enjoying the ride on such a fine day.

I have one more from last weekend, I had high hopes for this one as I was setting up to shoot it.

The clay pit

The clay pit

My thinking was that the goldenrod would be the foreground, the trees beginning to turn yellow the middle ground, and the green trees and their reflection, the background. However, once again, the scene ended up being too busy and it’s also lacking any leading lines to draw your eyes through the image. It makes me wonder if I should include wire cutters in my kit to cut through fences like the one that you can see here in order to get a better view of a scene? ๐Ÿ˜‰

There are several wetlands owned by the State of Michigan along the route that I’ve been driving for work each day, and they look like great places to shoot photos of birds. I see flocks of egrets hunting in those wetlands almost every day, along with a few great blue herons, and occasionally, green herons. However, all those wetlands are fenced oft prevent people from accessing them. So, it’s become a joke to ask myself if I should include wire cutters in my photo kit. What can I say, it’s very boring driving back and forth across the state every day, you have to amuse yourself some how.

Anyway, I have some more leftovers, this time from back in June.

Unidentified flowering objects

Unidentified flowering objects

 

Unidentified flowering objects

Unidentified flowering objects

I wish that all shorebirds would pose as nicely as the spotted sandpipers do.

Spotted sandpipers

Spotted sandpipers

 

Unidentified flowering object

Unidentified flowering object

 

Eastern swallowtail butterfly

Eastern swallowtail butterfly

This next one was shot on the same day as the first photo in this post, I was playing with different lighting on the iris.

Iris

Iris

 

Reed burr

Reed burr

 

Unidentified flowering object

Unidentified flowering object

 

Black hawthorn?

Black hawthorn?

I think that you can see why these didn’t make the original cut when I did the earlier posts from the trips that I took, yet they were too good to be deleted, since they represent the things that I saw. I usually post the images of birds first, then get around to the flowers and insects later, but they’re all part of the experiences that I had this past summer. I suppose that I should be more selective as I go through the images that I save for posts.

Here’s another example of that. I was proud to have shot this photo when I first saw it, but it didn’t wow me as I thought that it should.

Mourning dove in flight

Mourning dove in flight

That was also shot back in June, and I’m just getting around to posting it now. That was probably a mistake, since this one is better than many of the images that I’ve posted earlier this year.

Some of the photos that I have saved are part of a series of photos that I shot, like these next two.

Red-winged blackbird bringing a dragonfly to its young

Red-winged blackbird bringing a dragonfly to its young

You’ve already seen one or two of the images in the series that I shot, yet at the time that I shot them, I had other photos that I wanted to post even more. That’s funny, as I saved this next one to show that the blackbirds can still scold me even while they have a dragonfly in their mouth.

Red-winged blackbird bringing a dragonfly to its young

Red-winged blackbird bringing a dragonfly to its young

I have room for two more, so here they are.

Unidentified fungal object

Unidentified fungal object

I think that the photo above shows scrambled egg slime mold, but I’m not positive about that. This next one is definitely a mushroom, but I can’t identify it, even though I should be able to.

Unidentified fungal object

Unidentified fungal object

Well, I’ve filled another post, albeit with some of the poorer images that I’ve shot this summer. Even though I try, they can’t all be winners, yet the things that I’ve photographed and put into this post are all part of the days that I’ve had when I’ve been able to get outside and enjoy the fine summer that we’ve had here in Michigan.

That’s it for this one, thanks for stopping by!

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26 responses

  1. selah

    you have had a very busy summer.. I enjoyed looking at all your photos.

    September 23, 2016 at 10:54 am

    • Thank you very much Selah! It has been a very good summer.

      September 23, 2016 at 10:26 pm

  2. Very nice leftovers!!

    September 23, 2016 at 11:10 am

    • Thank you very much Michael!

      September 23, 2016 at 10:27 pm

  3. Fantastic left overs! Such detail to enjoy- the little bug on the sunflower, the flies on the smartweed and the ‘smile’ of the dragonfly! My favourites though are the light shining through the beautiful iris and that very smart spotted sandpiper. Such a rewarding collection of your summer photos. Hopefully, your new lens will arrive earlier than anticipated.

    September 23, 2016 at 12:21 pm

    • Thank you very much Marianne! Yes, I am getting more detail in all my photos lately, something that I’ve been working on. The new lens won’t come any earlier than Monday, the package delivery company only delivers on weekdays.

      September 23, 2016 at 10:30 pm

  4. Love the shot of the Spotted Sandpiper!

    September 23, 2016 at 12:23 pm

    • Thank you very much Bob!

      September 23, 2016 at 10:31 pm

  5. Some leftovers! Could be another photographer’s feast! ๐Ÿ™‚

    I am looking forward to see how the new lens will work for you.

    September 23, 2016 at 1:57 pm

    • Thank you very much Hein! I’ve read and heard a lot of good things about the new version of the 100-400 mm lens, I’ll see if those things are true. I know that it has to be more versatile than a 300 mm lens with a tele-converter behind it all the time.

      September 23, 2016 at 10:34 pm

  6. I wouldn’t call them poor images!
    I think the gray catbird with white berries is actually on a gray dogwood. The berries stay white on that dogwood and don’t turn blue like they do on silky dogwoods.
    I don’t know what the pink flowers are but the leaves don’t look like smartweed leaves.
    I like the shot of the clay pit but I don’t know what the purple flowers after it are. I don’t think I’ve ever seen them.
    The yellow flower looks like a coreopsis and the single white one looks like a Japanese anemone.
    The gangling white flowers look like black locust. There should have been sharp thorns on the branches.
    It was easy to pick a favorite this time. The spotted sandpiper on that white rock is a great shot.

    September 23, 2016 at 5:21 pm

    • Thank you very much Allen! I continue to raise my standards to force myself to do the best that I can with every subject.

      I suppose that there are at least half a million species of dogwoods, given my luck. There are some near where I shot the catbird that did turn blue, but I don’t pay enough attention to such things.

      Whatever the pink flowers are, the plants grow in shallow water.

      I’m so bad at IDing flowers, I thought that the coreopsis was what the yellow one was, but I wasn’t sure. I see that I labeled the black locust wrong also.

      I do wish that all species of birds would pose as nicely as the spotted sandpipers,I get more comments on photos of them than any other species because they are so easy to photograph.

      September 23, 2016 at 11:18 pm

  7. You take such excellent pictures, that iris was a wonderful image.

    September 24, 2016 at 6:30 am

    • Thank you very much Susan!

      September 24, 2016 at 8:09 am

  8. Beautiful pictures, as always, Jerry.

    September 24, 2016 at 9:51 am

    • Thank you very much Sue!

      September 24, 2016 at 3:34 pm

  9. VERY Good posts, beautiful blog.
    Congratulations.
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    September 24, 2016 at 4:48 pm

    • Thank you very much!

      September 24, 2016 at 5:20 pm

      • you’r welcome ๐Ÿ™‚

        September 24, 2016 at 5:23 pm

  10. Nothing wrong with leftovers, Jerry! Enjoyed all the images. I like the chickadee waving goodbye, and the catbird that didn’t want you to see what he was eating. ๐Ÿ™‚

    September 25, 2016 at 6:17 pm

    • Thank you very much Lavinia! I’d like to find a chickadee that’s waving hello as it poses for me. ๐Ÿ˜‰ The same goes for the catbird too.

      September 25, 2016 at 7:42 pm

  11. I wish I could take photographs half as good as these! The spotted sandpiper is wonderful! I also loved the iris photos, the coreopsis and the cute dog on the boat. Hope the new lens works well for you.

    September 25, 2016 at 9:17 pm

    • Thank you very much Clare! Remember, I’ve spent a small fortune on equipment, and I’ve devoted my life to shooting the best photos possible for me. I did a short test with the new lens today, it looks like a winner.

      September 26, 2016 at 5:30 pm

      • I am so pleased!

        September 26, 2016 at 5:40 pm

  12. Your close-ups are amazing, Jerry!

    October 1, 2016 at 9:16 am

    • Thank you very much Donna!

      October 1, 2016 at 10:24 am